1. See, when it comes to the number of people pledging to Team Dog versus Team Cat projects, the difference isn’t huge — dogs are up by just under 20%, whether you’re counting overall pledges or unique backers. But when it comes to the number of projects they were supporting, and the amount of money pledged, the difference is much bigger — around 60%. As a whole, Team Dog backers would seem to be spread more thinly across a larger number of projects, getting more ideas funded, while Team Cat backers are clustered around a smaller number of projects, with higher pledge counts and success rates.

    —Dogs vs. Cats: we analyzed the way that some cat- and dog-related statistics play out on Kickstarter. Spoiler alert: there’s no definitive answer.

  2. In honor of William “Billy Shakes” Shakespeare’s 450th birthday (so young!), we rounded up some projects related to the Bard. These projects range all across the board, from Theater and Publishing to Film and Technology. We’d say it’s a pretty good indicator of Shakespeare’s continued relevance.
First, there’s Globe to Globe Hamlet, a.k.a the most ambitious theatrical tour we’ve ever heard of (and our Project of the Day). The company Shakespeare’s Globe wants to take their production of Hamlet (including its twelve actors, four stage managers, and a minimalist set) on an extensive two-year tour through every single country in the world. 
The Boston-based company Wax Wings will also produce Hamlet, but they’ve set their version in the 1920s. It just happens to be the company’s first touring project.
Shakespeare on Demand is a digital platform meant for annotating the Bard’s complete works online. Any user of the platform has the ability to add their comments (open-source Shakespeare, anyone?). 
Perhaps you prefer your Shakespeare shaken, not stirred? Three Day Hangover’s project, Freakin’ Awesome 2014 Season, just might be for you. As part of their 2014 schedule, the booze-fueled, NY-based theater company is putting on Twelfth Night in a bar, complete with live-band karaoke. 
DIY Shakespeare is all about taking the classic works to film. Their 25-minute “episodes” are interpretations of the plays, and they’ll focus their next two on The Taming of the Shrew and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. You can see their first episode, based on Richard III, here. 
And let’s not forget about Shakespeare’s sonnets. The folks putting on the 4th Annual Shakespeare’s Birthday Sonnet Slam want to perform all 154 of them out loud, marathon-style, in Central Park! Performers range from ages 8-96, and the slam will take place on 4/25.

And those are just the live projects. You can browse all 181 Shakespeare-related projects here. Happy Birthday, Shakes. You don’t look a day over 400.  

    In honor of William “Billy Shakes” Shakespeare’s 450th birthday (so young!), we rounded up some projects related to the Bard. These projects range all across the board, from Theater and Publishing to Film and Technology. We’d say it’s a pretty good indicator of Shakespeare’s continued relevance.

    First, there’s Globe to Globe Hamlet, a.k.a the most ambitious theatrical tour we’ve ever heard of (and our Project of the Day). The company Shakespeare’s Globe wants to take their production of Hamlet (including its twelve actors, four stage managers, and a minimalist set) on an extensive two-year tour through every single country in the world. 

    The Boston-based company Wax Wings will also produce Hamlet, but they’ve set their version in the 1920s. It just happens to be the company’s first touring project.

    Shakespeare on Demand is a digital platform meant for annotating the Bard’s complete works online. Any user of the platform has the ability to add their comments (open-source Shakespeare, anyone?). 

    Perhaps you prefer your Shakespeare shaken, not stirred? Three Day Hangover’s project, Freakin’ Awesome 2014 Season, just might be for you. As part of their 2014 schedule, the booze-fueled, NY-based theater company is putting on Twelfth Night in a bar, complete with live-band karaoke. 

    DIY Shakespeare is all about taking the classic works to film. Their 25-minute “episodes” are interpretations of the plays, and they’ll focus their next two on The Taming of the Shrew and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. You can see their first episode, based on Richard III, here

    And let’s not forget about Shakespeare’s sonnets. The folks putting on the 4th Annual Shakespeare’s Birthday Sonnet Slam want to perform all 154 of them out loud, marathon-style, in Central Park! Performers range from ages 8-96, and the slam will take place on 4/25.

    And those are just the live projects. You can browse all 181 Shakespeare-related projects here. Happy Birthday, Shakes. You don’t look a day over 400.  

  3. I love weird abstract stuff as much as I love cool adventure comics or cerebral sci-fi epics. That said, I think that my favorite artists, both SG artists and generally speaking, have a strong element of “the hand” in their work. I wanna see the drawing.

    —Zack Soto of Study Group Comics on what kind of art appeals to him as a comics publisher. Read the rest of the interview here.  

  4. alpha-beta-gamer:

    Next Car Game is a great looking destruction heavy racing game with amazing environmental destruction, sophisticated physics-based driving dynamics and damage models.   It comes from Bugbear, developers of FlatOut and the recent Ridge Racer Unboundedboth games known for their high levels of destruction, but Next Car Game looks like it’s taking carnage to a whole new level.

    Even though it’s only a tech demo, it’s still great fun.  It’s just you, the car, and big playground to full of things to bash, jump, and destroy.  The  sheer amount of destruction on offer is fantastic and it does a great job of showcasing the game engines’ capabilities.  Bugbear may not of come up with a proper name for their game yet, but they have come up with the foundations of a very good game.

    Play the Tech Demo, Free

    View on Kickstarter
  5. Project of the Day—Reissuing a band’s earlier work is a noble endeavor all on its own, but doing it so lovingly is a whole other thing. Writer and musician Hank Shteamer wants to bring three lost classics from Cleveland band Craw back into the conversation. See lots of press about the project here, read our interview with Shteamer about the band here, and check out the project page right here. 

    Project of the Day—Reissuing a band’s earlier work is a noble endeavor all on its own, but doing it so lovingly is a whole other thing. Writer and musician Hank Shteamer wants to bring three lost classics from Cleveland band Craw back into the conversation. See lots of press about the project here, read our interview with Shteamer about the band here, and check out the project page right here

  6. omocat:

    THE OMORI KICKSTARTER IS UP!!!!!!!!

    making this game means the world to me

    be sure to check out the awesome music by SPACE BOYFRIEND and SLIME GIRLS as well

    OMORI is a surreal psychological horror RPGmaker game. You must travel between two worlds, both welcoming, both concealing the same secrets. Meet new (old) people, fight new (old) enemies, explore your own memories, and uncover some hidden truths along the way (although you wish you hadn’t.) When the time comes, you can only choose one. 

    OMORI is a character has been described as a “depressed otaku.”He started off as a character who lived on a blog, which lasted from December 2011 until March 2012.

    OMOCAT always envisioned OMORI as a game; and with the help of some friends (and you), the OMORI video game can be brought to life.

    View on Kickstarter
  7. We love the stained glass-inspired cover of Kate Milford’s new YA novel! The folks at boingboing called her previous Kickstarted novella “a haunting and inspiring young adult story set in 1913 small-town Missouri…Filled with mystery, cannonfire and the horrors of war and a villain who’s nightmare-scary, Kairos Mechanism is a great interlude and a fine way to tide readers over after we finish the just-published Broken Lands.” 
Milford has plans to work with the good people at McNally Jackson to print the books using their Espresso Book Machine.

    We love the stained glass-inspired cover of Kate Milford’s new YA novel! The folks at boingboing called her previous Kickstarted novella “a haunting and inspiring young adult story set in 1913 small-town Missouri…Filled with mystery, cannonfire and the horrors of war and a villain who’s nightmare-scary, Kairos Mechanism is a great interlude and a fine way to tide readers over after we finish the just-published Broken Lands.” 

    Milford has plans to work with the good people at McNally Jackson to print the books using their Espresso Book Machine.

  8. I panicked. And then I ran circles around my kitchen counter for several days straight. I had my housemate pinch me a lot, but that didn’t exactly help. I also lost all social propriety, blabbing to people on the street that I had an Eisner nomination, and being flabbergasted when they knew what that was. I suppose I don’t have the emotional tools to deal with this kind of news, and am hoping to wake up any moment, because this is just that crazy. I haven’t drawn a single panel since, ‘cause I can’t figure out what to do next with my life. Anyhow, I should get back to ogling my Google Analytics feed because I’m mesmerized by how many people are reading the novel right now.

    —Dax Tran-Caffee reacting to receiving an Eisner nomination for Failing SkyWe talked to a few nominees here

  9. In celebration of National Poetry Month, the Poetics app, which allows you to create word and picture poems, is calling for postcard submissions. Download the app, make your art, and then send it to the below address. It’ll be displayed on a rack in Kickstarter’s new gallery (did you know that we have a gallery?), waiting for someone to pick up and begin a correspondence. More info here.

    NYCorrespondence 
    58 Kent
    Brooklyn, NY 11222
    USA

  10. archiemcphee:

    Check out that awesome googly-eyed velociraptor! He’s a giant industrial origami project called KitRex and he was created by Lehigh University grad student Lisa Glover.

    "KitRex began as a homework assignment where I was asked to research a manufacturing process and demonstrate it in a unique way. I decided to research Industrial Origami, and over the course of 50 hours I designed, cut, and built a wearable 15-ft long velociraptor out of cardboard. I took him to a costume ball, and when I tromped into the room, literally everyone stopped to stare. He was the star of the evening, and everyone wanted one. I knew I had to do something."

    Lisa then started (and successfully funded) a KitRex Kickstarter project to help her mass-produce an adorable 3-foot-long KitRex (since most people don’t have the space for a 15-ft paper dino). After months of prototyping and testing with kids between 8 - 12 years old, the final KitRex was born as a bristol board model that’s easily flat-packed and shipped anywhere (But you have to add your own googly eyes). A few lucky Kickstarter contributors were rewarded with giant 15-foot KitRexes of their very own.

    Lisa isn’t quite ready to ship the KitRex, but for the time being you can click here to download a free pattern that fits on a standard 8x10 sheet of paper. It’ll be like playing with a dino hatchling.

    [via Uproxx and KitRex]

    View on Kickstarter