1. Project of the Day—It’s rare that we come across a more pleasing phrase than “gentle demolition,” but that’s exactly what we saw when we looked at this project. It is a 139-year-old gold house (it’s actually gold) that has fallen into disrepair. It is a staple of the neighborhood, but is now at the point where it needs to be demolished. Instead of tearing it all down in a wild frenzy, the hope is that the house can be carefully dismantled, so the pieces can be used to create something new.

    Project of the Day—It’s rare that we come across a more pleasing phrase than “gentle demolition,” but that’s exactly what we saw when we looked at this project. It is a 139-year-old gold house (it’s actually gold) that has fallen into disrepair. It is a staple of the neighborhood, but is now at the point where it needs to be demolished. Instead of tearing it all down in a wild frenzy, the hope is that the house can be carefully dismantled, so the pieces can be used to create something new.

  2. newyorker:

    Rachel Sussman has photographed some of Earth’s oldest living organisms, describing her project as “a battle to stay in deep time.” Of the thirty ancient living things that she’s photographed, two have since died.

    Top: Jomon Sugi, a Japanese cedar that is 2,180-7,000 years old (Photograph courtesy Rachel Sussman)

    Bottom: Pando, a clonal colony of Quaking Aspen that is 80,000 years old (Photograph courtesy Rachel Sussman)

    An old school Kickstarter project in the New Yorker. Dig! 

    View on Kickstarter
  3. I feel a duty. … I really think there’s a lot of music you can use to heal and save yourself. It’s not like I have some magic power and I reached inside somebody and said, ‘Oh, you didn’t know this about yourself until I wrote this song.’ That’s not true. What I did is I made a thing, and somebody who needed to find something found mine and chose to meet me out on that ground.

    —John Darnielle, who records as Mountain Goats, on making and sharing his music.

  4. ananthymous:

    CUTTINGS proof

    We got a plotter proof for CUTTINGS from the printer. It took a few days to get our notes together, but everything’s looking good. 

    For this book in particular, we’re using (on various editions) spot gloss, foil stamping, pantone endsheets and a dust jacket with foil stamping + die-cut. This is probably the most complicated cover I’ve put together, although the Exquisite Beast LTD comes close. I came up with a trick for the binding of the CUTTINGS LTD that I’m proud of, but the best way to explain will be to show. Happy to say I get better and learn something new every time.

    More news via Kickstarter when I have it (you’ll have to log in). Thanks everyone who backed the book, we’re workin’ hard for you. 

    johnnywander.com

    View on Kickstarter