1. Mine-detecting tumbleweed.
Afghan artist Massoud Hassani invented a simple machine for his war-torn homeland.
Mine Kafon is a low-cost landmine detonator powered by the wind. Like a man-made tumbleweed, the device rolls across flat terrain to activate buried mines, relaying their locations back to a home base. It’s thoughtful design with the power to make the world a better place.
Our Project of the Day, Mine Kafon seeks funds to rebuild the prototype and deploy in Afghanistan.

    Mine-detecting tumbleweed.

    Afghan artist Massoud Hassani invented a simple machine for his war-torn homeland.

    Mine Kafon is a low-cost landmine detonator powered by the wind. Like a man-made tumbleweed, the device rolls across flat terrain to activate buried mines, relaying their locations back to a home base. It’s thoughtful design with the power to make the world a better place.

    Our Project of the Day, Mine Kafon seeks funds to rebuild the prototype and deploy in Afghanistan.

  2. Danger zone.

    Afghan artist Massoud Hassani invented a simple machine for his war-torn homeland.

    Mine Kafon is a low-cost landmine detonator powered by the wind. Like a man-made tumbleweed, the device rolls across flat terrain to activate buried mines, relaying their locations back to a home base. The artist’s new Kickstarter project seeks funds to rebuild the prototype and deploy in Afghanistan.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. The Buddhas of Mes Aynak.

    Documentarian Brent Huffman is racing against the clock.

    Last year, Huffman began work on the story of Mes Aynak, an ancient Buddhist city located in the desert of eastern Afghanistan. An archaeological wonder, the 2,600-year-old site is home to an enormous monastery complex, many temples, and hundreds of statues, representing a major cultural legacy for the war-torn country. But by the end of the year, the entire city may be destroyed.

    The site currently belongs to a Chinese mining conglomerate, which expects to extract up to $100 billion of copper from beneath the city, leveling it in the process. A major financial windfall for the beleagured Afghan government, the proposal is nevertheless hotly contested by displaced locals, concerned environmentalists, and a small team of archaeologists working overtime to preserve Mes Aynak.

    Huffman just launched a Kickstarter project to fund his documentary, which will bring the story of the site to a wider audience. He hopes to mobilize international pressure to save the ancient city, while broadening the discussion around foreign investment in Afghanistan as a decade of war winds down and money begins to flow.

  4. Art during wartime.

    The Streets of Afghanistan is a public art installation that aims to immerse viewers in the busy streets of Kabul and the roads of rural Afghanistan through a combination of life-size photographs, video projections, live music, kites, and — most importantly — people.

    The exhibit was supported by a Kickstarter project that reached its funding goal just a few months ago, and has since gone on to stage five successful shows and two photo installations at historic sites across Afghanistan — from Kabul’s historic Darulaman Palace to the heavily damaged village of Istalif.

    According to the creators’ most recent project update, the largest exhibition took place at The Barbur Gardens in Kabul, which over 1000 locals came to visit on the installation’s second day.