1. “I’ve always liked the idea of making hard objects soft. You know how you really love something? I used to have these strange obsessions when I was a kid. I was obsessed with food, I had some kind of thing with food where I wanted to pair it with all the cuddly animals that I had, and I obviously could never find cuddly cans or cuddly pizza. I had these ideas for toys and I was so disappointed that no one was making them. I guess it came from that. My mum taught me how to sew and suddenly this whole world opened up. ” —Lucy Sparrow, creator of Cornershop, a store made entirely of felt.

    I’ve always liked the idea of making hard objects soft. You know how you really love something? I used to have these strange obsessions when I was a kid. I was obsessed with food, I had some kind of thing with food where I wanted to pair it with all the cuddly animals that I had, and I obviously could never find cuddly cans or cuddly pizza. I had these ideas for toys and I was so disappointed that no one was making them. I guess it came from that. My mum taught me how to sew and suddenly this whole world opened up. ” —Lucy Sparrow, creator of Cornershop, a store made entirely of felt.

  2. "Walking into the city, you found narrow alleys between the buildings with dripping pipes overhead, discharge flowing in gutters, people stripped to the waist in their underwear working in tiny factories, the sound of metal pounding metal, butchered animals, unlicensed dentists, a two-man rubber plunger factory, carts stacked with steaming food, everything mixed together. It felt unreal (especially in the early days), and yet totally normal to everyone living and working there." —Photographer Greg Girard, on life inside the City of Darkness. 

    "Walking into the city, you found narrow alleys between the buildings with dripping pipes overhead, discharge flowing in gutters, people stripped to the waist in their underwear working in tiny factories, the sound of metal pounding metal, butchered animals, unlicensed dentists, a two-man rubber plunger factory, carts stacked with steaming food, everything mixed together. It felt unreal (especially in the early days), and yet totally normal to everyone living and working there." —Photographer Greg Girard, on life inside the City of Darkness

  3. Not only did we not expect it to end up in a museum design store, we didn’t plan on a business, or even a proper product. We launched NeoLucida because we were inspired by David Hockney’s book, Secret Knowledge. He used an antique camera lucida to see how great masters of art might have seen the world. So to give our students this experience, we decided to make an inexpensive camera lucida so more people could experiment. But when we received nearly 3000% over our goal, and 11,406 people backed the project, we found ourselves designing for the marketplace instead of making a simple, small scale experiment. So being part of the Kickstarter @MoMA collection is a thrill, but far from where we thought we would be last year.

    —Pablo Garcia on making the NeoLucida, and how it ended up in the MoMA Design Store.