1. A collaboration between designers Jessica Karle Heltzel and Tim Hoover, founders of the site 100 Days of Design Entrepreneurship, Kern and Burn aims to dissect the professional lives of designers who forgo traditional agency jobs in favor of following their own  dreams and aspirations and, in turn, creating self-initiated careers. Always amazing to watch creators take the power back from their industries and find ways to magically create their own worlds, in turn inspiring the next generation of designers to do the same. And so, it is our Project of the Day. 

    A collaboration between designers Jessica Karle Heltzel and Tim Hoover, founders of the site 100 Days of Design Entrepreneurship, Kern and Burn aims to dissect the professional lives of designers who forgo traditional agency jobs in favor of following their own  dreams and aspirations and, in turn, creating self-initiated careers. Always amazing to watch creators take the power back from their industries and find ways to magically create their own worlds, in turn inspiring the next generation of designers to do the same. And so, it is our Project of the Day

  2. The Internet has long been heralded as a game-changing force for the arts industry, but, for many creative types, it’s been mostly responsible for the proliferation of piracy, illegal downloading, and wreaking havoc on established business models. Still, the feeling that its egalitarian nature could produce unique opportunities for emerging artists has persisted, and now, Kickstarter has begun to fulfill that promise. A high-tech take on arts patronage, Kickstarter is being used by Baltimore artists to bankroll a diverse array of projects that might not otherwise get funding — from a documentary film about urban dirt-bike riders to Showbeast.

    Kickstarting the Arts Scene. We thought this piece from Baltimore Magazine was fantastic.

  3. Today’s Project of the Day is the first season of 1,000 Fathoms. 
"Internet Killed the Radio Star." That is not a song, because it’s not true! Exhibit A — Baltimore’s Erin Gleeson, whose voice has been heard loud and clear wherever radio waves can travel. In order to ensure its fruitful history, Gleeson is working on the first season of her own show — 1000 Fathoms, which will combine wild real world stories with top-notch tunes from Baltimore’s finest, including Dan Deacon, Future Islands and more. Tune in!

    Today’s Project of the Day is the first season of 1,000 Fathoms

    "Internet Killed the Radio Star." That is not a song, because it’s not true! Exhibit A — Baltimore’s Erin Gleeson, whose voice has been heard loud and clear wherever radio waves can travel. In order to ensure its fruitful history, Gleeson is working on the first season of her own show — 1000 Fathoms, which will combine wild real world stories with top-notch tunes from Baltimore’s finest, including Dan Deacon, Future Islands and more. Tune in!

  4. LAST CALL for Matt Porterfield’s I Used To Be Darker. $36k down. $4k to go. 27 hours to get there. After Porterfield’s knockout guest post on The Kickstarter Blog, how could you not want to roll deep with the guy?
This is Porterfield’s second KSR project. His first, Putty Hill, had a healthy run on the festival circuit and a critically-acclaimed theatrical release. The fiercely independent Maryland filmmaker has spent the past decade honing his craft—a uniquely empathetic brand of realist Baltimore filmmaking where truths emerge through the atmosphere and sincerity is not a dirty word. Just like his Kickstarter videos, Porterfield’s films are honest, reflective, and quietly urgent. He describes I Used To Be Darker as a film about “people finding each other and letting each other go.” As his absurd project video attests, Porterfield is most definitely in it to win it.
Click here to support the project.

    LAST CALL for Matt Porterfield’s I Used To Be Darker. $36k down. $4k to go. 27 hours to get there. After Porterfield’s knockout guest post on The Kickstarter Blog, how could you not want to roll deep with the guy?

    This is Porterfield’s second KSR project. His first, Putty Hill, had a healthy run on the festival circuit and a critically-acclaimed theatrical release. The fiercely independent Maryland filmmaker has spent the past decade honing his craft—a uniquely empathetic brand of realist Baltimore filmmaking where truths emerge through the atmosphere and sincerity is not a dirty word. Just like his Kickstarter videos, Porterfield’s films are honest, reflective, and quietly urgent. He describes I Used To Be Darker as a film about “people finding each other and letting each other go.” As his absurd project video attests, Porterfield is most definitely in it to win it.

    Click here to support the project.