1. A spectrometer is an ubiquitous scientific tool used to identify unknown materials (like oil soil residue or coal tar in urban waterways, for example) — which is awesome, but they also tend to cost thousands of dollars be very difficult to use. That is, until Public Lab came along and designed this super nifty, super cheap open hardware version they call the DIY Spectrometry Kit. They’ve also created an open source software system to collect, analyze, and compare user-contributed data, and created an experimental version which converts your phone into a spectrometer on-the-fly. Woah. In the spirit of spectrometry and citizen science, we’re  making them our Project of the Day.

    A spectrometer is an ubiquitous scientific tool used to identify unknown materials (like oil soil residue or coal tar in urban waterways, for example) — which is awesome, but they also tend to cost thousands of dollars be very difficult to use. That is, until Public Lab came along and designed this super nifty, super cheap open hardware version they call the DIY Spectrometry Kit. They’ve also created an open source software system to collect, analyze, and compare user-contributed data, and created an experimental version which converts your phone into a spectrometer on-the-fly. Woah. In the spirit of spectrometry and citizen science, we’re making them our Project of the Day.

  2. Last August, Ray Sumser began a project called the Cartoonuum, wherein he planned to hand draw 2,000 recognizable cartoon characters into a massive, ultra-colorful mural. He used Kickstarter to raise funds for supplies, but also to source character suggestions from the crowd. The response was unbelievable. And although the project was labor intensive — “It was a mammoth undertaking that claimed months, threw out my shoulder and scrambled a portion of my sanity while I worked on it,” he relates — it only gave him a taste for more. Enter the Characternity , a project to illustrate the entire cartoon universe. In the word’s of at least one highly recognizable animated character, “Here we go!”

    Last August, Ray Sumser began a project called the Cartoonuum, wherein he planned to hand draw 2,000 recognizable cartoon characters into a massive, ultra-colorful mural. He used Kickstarter to raise funds for supplies, but also to source character suggestions from the crowd. The response was unbelievable. And although the project was labor intensive — “It was a mammoth undertaking that claimed months, threw out my shoulder and scrambled a portion of my sanity while I worked on it,” he relates — it only gave him a taste for more. Enter the Characternity , a project to illustrate the entire cartoon universe. In the word’s of at least one highly recognizable animated character, “Here we go!

  3. Wildlife Identification Bandanas. Roger Peet makes art about animals, specifically extinct and endangered species, and the (often negative) impact that humans have on nature. He believes art plays an important role in conservation, and after checking out some of his work (like the print, above) — we think he has a point. You can check out more of his pieces, and back for one of his screen printed bandanas, on his project page.

    Wildlife Identification Bandanas. Roger Peet makes art about animals, specifically extinct and endangered species, and the (often negative) impact that humans have on nature. He believes art plays an important role in conservation, and after checking out some of his work (like the print, above) — we think he has a point. You can check out more of his pieces, and back for one of his screen printed bandanas, on his project page.

  4. The title kind of says it all with this one: print on fabric with sunlight. That’s right! Brought to us by the design studio Lumi, this is a totally new kind of photographic print process for textiles, which uses light-sensitive, water-based dyes that develop their color in sunlight — creating gorgeous, color-saturated prints on (pick one) your favorite t-shirt, a scarf, a wallet, the back pocket of those old jeans, etc. Hell, pick ‘em all! Backers can snag the basic starter kit for a $35 pledge. We snagged ‘em as our Project of the Day.

    The title kind of says it all with this one: print on fabric with sunlight. That’s right! Brought to us by the design studio Lumi, this is a totally new kind of photographic print process for textiles, which uses light-sensitive, water-based dyes that develop their color in sunlight — creating gorgeous, color-saturated prints on (pick one) your favorite t-shirt, a scarf, a wallet, the back pocket of those old jeans, etc. Hell, pick ‘em all! Backers can snag the basic starter kit for a $35 pledge. We snagged ‘em as our Project of the Day.

  5. Korduroy.TV is a rad site that describes itself as “the breeding ground for independent surf culture.” They create short films, post interviews with creative surfing types, and showcase video tutorials on everything from how to change your oil to shaping your own surfboard. They’re also successful project creators, and they just posted this awesome update:

    After raising over $13,000 after prize costs and fees, and launching our new website with revamped shows … we had our inaugural Camp Korduroy workshop at our headquarters in sunny San Diego for our top Kickstarter backers — Per Anderson, Todd Anderson, Matt Thomson and Gustavo Oliva.

    Totally digging this video! Check out their original project here.