1. Project of the Day—The Los Angeles Review of Books is one of our favorite places to read about books (we read a lot about books), so it’s only natural that we’d be excited to see a publication featuring the writing of LARB’s interns. Think of it as them showing what they learned, or just think of it as a bunch of interesting writing on interesting subjects like David Lynch’s Los Angeles, which can’t ever be explored enough. 

    Project of the Day—The Los Angeles Review of Books is one of our favorite places to read about books (we read a lot about books), so it’s only natural that we’d be excited to see a publication featuring the writing of LARB’s interns. Think of it as them showing what they learned, or just think of it as a bunch of interesting writing on interesting subjects like David Lynch’s Los Angeles, which can’t ever be explored enough. 

  2. That’s entertainment.
In just five years, the Cinefamily has become a staple of LA’s film landscape.
This nonprofit move house injected new life into the historic Silent Movie Theater, bringing exhaustive retrospectives, crazy found-footage festivals, awesome midnight movies, and a slew of indie premieres to a passionate audience.
Now the cinema is raising funds to finally update their hand-built theater for a new century. This silver screen dream is our Project of the Day.

    That’s entertainment.

    In just five years, the Cinefamily has become a staple of LA’s film landscape.

    This nonprofit move house injected new life into the historic Silent Movie Theater, bringing exhaustive retrospectives, crazy found-footage festivals, awesome midnight movies, and a slew of indie premieres to a passionate audience.

    Now the cinema is raising funds to finally update their hand-built theater for a new century. This silver screen dream is our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Dreamland.

    Never Built: Los Angeles explores the landscape of unrealized projects designed for LA.

    A mixture of architecture, urban design, and infrastructure fantasies that never left the drawing board, this exhibition will include work from Frank Lloyd Wright, John Lautner, Rudolph Schindler, Frank Gehry, and many others.

    LA’s Architecture and Design Museum created a Kickstarter project to help fund the exhibition, which is finally within reach after two years of research.

    View on Kickstarter
  4. Moving images.

    Located just a stone’s throw from Hollywood, Young Projects incubates and exhibits motion pictures of a different stripe.

    This artist-run gallery is one of the few in the country devoted entirely to video and digital media, creating an essential venue for experimental work in the belly of the entertainment industry. Faced with a daunting budget gap and an exciting slate of 2013 programming, the gallery’s founder created a Kickstarter project to gauge the interest of the Los Angeles arts community. 

    We’re happy to report that Young Projects just exceeded its goal, promising another year of innovative artwork in the digital realm for Angelenos and beyond.

  5. In 1984, the city of Los Angeles invited ten renowned artists to create original artworks for public display in honor of that year’s Olympic Games. The finished murals became a great source of civic pride, but the intervening decades saw them fall into heavy despair. Enter The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles, a coalition of artists, public art advocates, and city officials that set about meticulously restoring these massive pieces of public art. Above, you can see them at work on Glenna Avila’s “L.A. Freeway Kids” — check out more on their Kickstarter page.

    In 1984, the city of Los Angeles invited ten renowned artists to create original artworks for public display in honor of that year’s Olympic Games. The finished murals became a great source of civic pride, but the intervening decades saw them fall into heavy despair. Enter The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles, a coalition of artists, public art advocates, and city officials that set about meticulously restoring these massive pieces of public art. Above, you can see them at work on Glenna Avila’s “L.A. Freeway Kids” — check out more on their Kickstarter page.