1. Read, read, read. Read everything — trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it.
    Then write. If it’s good, you’ll find out. If it’s not, throw it out of the window.

    —William Faulkner, who would have turned 117 today.

  2. Project of the Day—Los Angeles has a vibrant and fascinating contemporary art scene, and for awhile now East of Borneo has nurtured a ”collective reexamination of West Coast art and its history, highlighting unexpected connections and encouraging new lines of thought.” In short, it’s a great site, and it wants to be greater. They’ve also got books and posters and all sorts of great stuff in the pipeline.

    Project of the Day—Los Angeles has a vibrant and fascinating contemporary art scene, and for awhile now East of Borneo has nurtured a collective reexamination of West Coast art and its history, highlighting unexpected connections and encouraging new lines of thought.” In short, it’s a great site, and it wants to be greater. They’ve also got books and posters and all sorts of great stuff in the pipeline.

  3. Project of the Day—James Kerr’s Scorpion Dagger is an augmented art book that features “GIF remixes of Early and northern Renaissance paintings.” What that means is that it’s a physical book, but if you hold your phone up to specific images, they become animated—often hypnotically so.

  4. Project of the Day—The Los Angeles Review of Books is one of our favorite places to read about books (we read a lot about books), so it’s only natural that we’d be excited to see a publication featuring the writing of LARB’s interns. Think of it as them showing what they learned, or just think of it as a bunch of interesting writing on interesting subjects like David Lynch’s Los Angeles, which can’t ever be explored enough. 

    Project of the Day—The Los Angeles Review of Books is one of our favorite places to read about books (we read a lot about books), so it’s only natural that we’d be excited to see a publication featuring the writing of LARB’s interns. Think of it as them showing what they learned, or just think of it as a bunch of interesting writing on interesting subjects like David Lynch’s Los Angeles, which can’t ever be explored enough. 

  5. A kind of literary voyeurism, in which visitors get to contemplate the reading habits of their neighbors. Who left the Brazilian travel guides, and who’s reading Camus? Who added Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84, my favorite novel of the last five years? And where will my copy of The Odyssey end up when I leave it in the library for someone else? By peeking into the reading lives of fellow Little Free Library users, you get to know your block better.

    —Margaret Aldrich on the low-tech appeal of little free libraries

  6. The art that comes from the punk scene is typically confrontational and disturbing and shakes people free from habitual thought and falling back into unquestioning ideology. That’s not to forget the strong feminist message within the movement. We are in no doubt that there are deeply philosophical ideas that sit beneath punk, and it’s our view that this is why punk has had such massive influence.

    —From our interview with the creators of the book The Truth of Revolution, Brother, which talks about the philosophy of the punk movement. Read the rest here.

  7. The beauty of Kickstarter is that it’s not only a pre-order channel - it’s a creative process for both project creator and backers. Talk to your backers. Understand what they are looking to get. Take them on a journey.

    —Linda Liukas, creator of Hello Ruby, on how to think about and organize your Kickstarter project. The full text is over at her blog, and it’s well worth a read!