1. Making a Plymptoon.
Legendary animator Bill Plympton is trying something new: A feature film made entirely from more than 40,000 hand-painted frames.
Plympton is currently funding his seventh feature film, Cheatin’, on Kickstarter. A grown-up tale of jealousy, revenge, and murder shot through with Plympton’s surreal sense of humor, the film would never stand a chance in a traditional studio system. But with 175 backers behind him and counting, the artist’s most ambitious project is our Project of the Day.

    Making a Plymptoon.

    Legendary animator Bill Plympton is trying something new: A feature film made entirely from more than 40,000 hand-painted frames.

    Plympton is currently funding his seventh feature film, Cheatin’, on Kickstarter. A grown-up tale of jealousy, revenge, and murder shot through with Plympton’s surreal sense of humor, the film would never stand a chance in a traditional studio system. But with 175 backers behind him and counting, the artist’s most ambitious project is our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Wile E. Coyote deserves a refund.
Chicago artist/designer/maker Rob Loukotka is obsessed with the Acme Corporation. The fictional purveyor of shoddy novelties to Loony Tunes’ ravenous Coyote, Acme makes just about everything — and none of it ever works.
Loukotka rewatched every episode of the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons, making note of the endless array of Acme-branded products that appear throughout. From tornado machines and anvils to rocket skis and exploding bird seed, Acme seems to have just what Coyote needs to finally catch the speedy bird. Except, time after time, it just blows up in his face.
Take a look at the poster that Loukotka has illustrated and designed, featuring every shoddy Acme gadget from the entire series. You’ll just have to imagine the unique ways in which all of them malfunctioned, leaving Road Runner to “beep-beep” for yet another day.

    Wile E. Coyote deserves a refund.

    Chicago artist/designer/maker Rob Loukotka is obsessed with the Acme Corporation. The fictional purveyor of shoddy novelties to Loony Tunes’ ravenous Coyote, Acme makes just about everything — and none of it ever works.

    Loukotka rewatched every episode of the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons, making note of the endless array of Acme-branded products that appear throughout. From tornado machines and anvils to rocket skis and exploding bird seed, Acme seems to have just what Coyote needs to finally catch the speedy bird. Except, time after time, it just blows up in his face.

    Take a look at the poster that Loukotka has illustrated and designed, featuring every shoddy Acme gadget from the entire series. You’ll just have to imagine the unique ways in which all of them malfunctioned, leaving Road Runner to “beep-beep” for yet another day.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Life Begins at Incorporation.
Matt Bors has been obsessively drawing political cartoons every week since 2003. A finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize, Bors’ work has been printed in papers across the country — but he’s still never published a collection of his work. 
Now Bors has compiled his satirical gems into a single 225-page volume, Life Begins at Incorporation, and he’s looking for backers to make his book a reality. The cartoonist sees America getting more “cray cray” by the day, and his darkly funny drawings are payback. Just in time for two more days of political madness, Bors’ book is our Project of the Day.

    Life Begins at Incorporation.

    Matt Bors has been obsessively drawing political cartoons every week since 2003. A finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize, Bors’ work has been printed in papers across the country — but he’s still never published a collection of his work. 

    Now Bors has compiled his satirical gems into a single 225-page volume, Life Begins at Incorporation, and he’s looking for backers to make his book a reality. The cartoonist sees America getting more “cray cray” by the day, and his darkly funny drawings are payback. Just in time for two more days of political madness, Bors’ book is our Project of the Day.

  4. From John Kricfalusi, creator of Ren and Stimpy, comes Cans Without Labels, a George Liquor Cartoon. Is there much more that we need to say about this one? From the project description — ”Of course we couldn’t have KLEENEX so we blew our noses in our poodle’s clipped torso fur” — to the totally rad rewards — ”Get an original, possibly food stained, hand drawn doodle” — to the hyperactively charming pitch video, John K’s project is a winner through and through. It’s also our Project of the Day.

    From John Kricfalusi, creator of Ren and Stimpy, comes Cans Without Labels, a George Liquor Cartoon. Is there much more that we need to say about this one? From the project description — ”Of course we couldn’t have KLEENEX so we blew our noses in our poodle’s clipped torso fur” — to the totally rad rewards — ”Get an original, possibly food stained, hand drawn doodle” — to the hyperactively charming pitch video, John K’s project is a winner through and through. It’s also our Project of the Day.

  5. A mere four months ago, artist Ray Sumser set out on the self-appointed, incredibly ambitious task of completing a 7’ x 9’ oil painting housing 2,000+ recognizable cartoon characters. He dubbed it the Cartoonum, and after some spectacular time lapse videos of his progress, it’s completed! Check out his most recent update for more, and revel in all it’s comic-cartoony-goodness above. Of the final print going to backers, he reveals: 
The image you are seeing is the result of a week of photo trials. This final version is composed of 87 stitched together images. It is over 20,000 pixels across and was a real puzzle (and headache!) to figure out. 
Impressive!

    A mere four months ago, artist Ray Sumser set out on the self-appointed, incredibly ambitious task of completing a 7’ x 9’ oil painting housing 2,000+ recognizable cartoon characters. He dubbed it the Cartoonum, and after some spectacular time lapse videos of his progress, it’s completed! Check out his most recent update for more, and revel in all it’s comic-cartoony-goodness above. Of the final print going to backers, he reveals:

    The image you are seeing is the result of a week of photo trials. This final version is composed of 87 stitched together images. It is over 20,000 pixels across and was a real puzzle (and headache!) to figure out.

    Impressive!
  6. "It’s just now Tuesday. Since Saturday afternoon I have drawn 704 characters with a Sharpie, most of them attempted for the first time in my life. I’m watching characters come to life at the tip of my marker. I’m rapidly developing my cartoon shorthand. I’ve started letting some of my larger compositional elements fall back into the piece, a sad but necessary step. This thing is going all the way to the edges and will be maximized in every way possible. I don’t have a sense of how many characters will be included when all is said and done. I can say with certainty I’m well past 2,000 right now. I’m looking at a desired ‘add list’ of about 560 more." Ray Sumser on the progress of The Cartoonuum.