1. Dirty magazines.

    SOILED is an architectural magazine that likes to get dirty.

    Each issue breaks open issues of public space and urban design to share messy stories about the world we’ve built for ourselves. The team is currently funding its next issue, Windowscrapers — an exploration of surveillance, voyeurism, and privacy from an architect’s point of view.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Dhaka’s first bus map.

    Dhaka is the capital of Bangladesh and home to millions, but the megacity doesn’t have a bus map. This project enlists local volunteers to help chart the city’s complex transit system and makes the map freely available to the public. This civic-minded urban intervention is our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Designing Seaside from scratch.

    Seaside, Florida is, by all accounts, a lovely place to live.

    The first master-planned community in the United States to reflect the tenets of New Urbanism, Seaside is at once a quiet beach town and a laboratory for creative directions in architecture, urban planning, and community development. Visions of Seaside will serve as the definitive guide to the Seaside project, including drawings and commentary from major collaborators on the town’s design and outlines for the future. 

    Visions of Seaside explores the potential of an entirely new town as our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  4. A Creational Trail.
Matireal demonstrates that a simple idea can transform a local problem into a network of new possibilities. 
Environmental architect Keith Hayes began his project with a nearly unlimited resource: used tires. The goal is to connect two neighborhoods that are currently divided by a disused railroad and a six-lane road, while reusing discarded tires that litter both neighborhoods and breed those infamous Wisconsin mosquitos.
By transforming trashed tires into matireal — a geotextile infilled with gravel and sod — Hayes hopes to build an art corridor along an abandoned industrial route and connect communities together. Residents benefit; trash is recycled; private land becomes public; economic opportunties are created; and the model is proven, clearing a path for similar projects in other cities. 
How’s that for a win-win-win-win-win?

    A Creational Trail.

    Matireal demonstrates that a simple idea can transform a local problem into a network of new possibilities. 

    Environmental architect Keith Hayes began his project with a nearly unlimited resource: used tires. The goal is to connect two neighborhoods that are currently divided by a disused railroad and a six-lane road, while reusing discarded tires that litter both neighborhoods and breed those infamous Wisconsin mosquitos.

    By transforming trashed tires into matireal — a geotextile infilled with gravel and sod — Hayes hopes to build an art corridor along an abandoned industrial route and connect communities together. Residents benefit; trash is recycled; private land becomes public; economic opportunties are created; and the model is proven, clearing a path for similar projects in other cities. 

    How’s that for a win-win-win-win-win?