1. bitesbitesbites:

New York Student Selling His Private Data on KickstarterFederico Zannier is trying to find out. Emails, chat logs, location data, browser history, screenshots—you name it, the New York-based software developer is selling it all. With a Kickstarter campaign launched earlier this month, Zannier, a 28-year-old Italian-born master’s student at NYU, is offering to hand over a day’s digital footprint for a measly $2. http://slate.me/10uxaon

Have you ever thought about how many bites of data you generate each day? Federico Zannier wants you to start doing just that.

    bitesbitesbites:

    New York Student Selling His Private Data on Kickstarter
    Federico Zannier is trying to find out. Emails, chat logs, location data, browser history, screenshots—you name it, the New York-based software developer is selling it all. With a Kickstarter campaign launched earlier this month, Zannier, a 28-year-old Italian-born master’s student at NYU, is offering to hand over a day’s digital footprint for a measly $2.
    http://slate.me/10uxaon

    Have you ever thought about how many bites of data you generate each day? Federico Zannier wants you to start doing just that.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Breaking it down.
Thank you to The Economist for pointing out that Dance experienced the highest success rate of any category in 2012. One of our favorite fun facts!
theeconomist:


Daily chart: what works on Kickstarter. 44% of Kickstarter projects launched last year managed to raise the money they requested. Games raised the most cash, but dance projects were most likely to reach their funding targets.

    Breaking it down.

    Thank you to The Economist for pointing out that Dance experienced the highest success rate of any category in 2012. One of our favorite fun facts!

    theeconomist:

    Daily chart: what works on Kickstarter. 44% of Kickstarter projects launched last year managed to raise the money they requested. Games raised the most cash, but dance projects were most likely to reach their funding targets.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Just launched: Map 005 CHERNOBYL, a publication. MAP (Manual of Architecural Possibilities) is a non-profit publication that merges science and research with architectural design to scrutinize subjects — ”Flood” and “Archive” are two examples — from multiple perspectives. The information is then presented as an A1, folded into the shape of a traditional map. Research and data are on one side, architectural projects on the other.

    Their fifth issue will tackle the history, consequences, and possible future of nuclear power. Twenty five years after the disaster in Chernobyl, and with the incident in Fukushima still unfolding around us, this is a very timely topic. It’s also an all around fascinating project. Check out more on their project page.