1. First look.
A sneak peek at the back cover of Emergence, a new comics anthology from the Pacific Northwest.
We couldn’t be more excited to ring in a new year, filled with new projects and new bursts of creativity. Here’s to 2013! Now let’s go exploring.
neoglyphicmedia:


EMERGENCE back cover.
Artist credits to: Theo Ellsworth, Sean Christensen, and Amy Kuttab.

    First look.

    A sneak peek at the back cover of Emergence, a new comics anthology from the Pacific Northwest.

    We couldn’t be more excited to ring in a new year, filled with new projects and new bursts of creativity. Here’s to 2013! Now let’s go exploring.

    neoglyphicmedia:

    EMERGENCE back cover.

    Artist credits to: Theo Ellsworth, Sean Christensen, and Amy Kuttab.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Doodlers wanted.
Since 2006, the New Orleans-based 24 Hour Draw-a-Thon has been a yearly highlight for doodle enthusiasts everywhere.
The free art event is an open invitation for anybody, of any age, to come and mingle, dance, and draw the night away. The Draw-a-Thon’s mission being to “encourage creating for the sake of creating.” Even if you’ve never drawn a line in your life, the organizers will host a variety of instructional workshops, so you can spruce up your sketching chops before getting down to the business of putting pen to paper. Who knows? By the time you’re done, you may have made an entire comic book, not to mention a few new friends. 
For art’s sake, we’re making this one our Project of the Day.

    Doodlers wanted.

    Since 2006, the New Orleans-based 24 Hour Draw-a-Thon has been a yearly highlight for doodle enthusiasts everywhere.

    The free art event is an open invitation for anybody, of any age, to come and mingle, dance, and draw the night away. The Draw-a-Thon’s mission being to “encourage creating for the sake of creating.” Even if you’ve never drawn a line in your life, the organizers will host a variety of instructional workshops, so you can spruce up your sketching chops before getting down to the business of putting pen to paper. Who knows? By the time you’re done, you may have made an entire comic book, not to mention a few new friends. 

    For art’s sake, we’re making this one our Project of the Day.

  3. Fig 5.2.: Noah’s Brain
So, this is how much illustrator Noah Kroese loves to draw. Consider us sympathetic to his condition — and not only because we can relate to the “pizza” and “Star Wars" parts. We’re also a big fan of his graphic novel, Saturday, which is about a little girl named India and how she copes with a really, really bad week. It’s dark, funny, and, hey now, it involves dinosaurs. Haven’t we all been there before?! Check out his video for more details (and more Star Wars comparisons). Also, if we drew a graphic of our brains right now, it would mostly be us loving this project.

    Fig 5.2.: Noah’s Brain

    So, this is how much illustrator Noah Kroese loves to draw. Consider us sympathetic to his condition — and not only because we can relate to the “pizza” and “Star Wars" parts. We’re also a big fan of his graphic novel, Saturday, which is about a little girl named India and how she copes with a really, really bad week. It’s dark, funny, and, hey now, it involves dinosaurs. Haven’t we all been there before?! Check out his video for more details (and more Star Wars comparisons). Also, if we drew a graphic of our brains right now, it would mostly be us loving this project.

  4. For a quick snapshot of why we love comic book character Hangboy so much, let’s reflect on his life story a moment: In his infancy, HANGBoY could be found defiling himself on napkins, notebook pages, whiteboards, and even beach sand. Since then he has matured (a little) and can be found immortalized on more formal media such as full color prints and sculptures. In every situation, HANGBoY’s message is clear: “Let’s play!”, as he never takes life too serious.

Hangboy is actually so mischievous that his creator claims to be unable to control him. In fact, he alleges that all he did for his new book, Hangboy: World War Too, was to build a bunch of World War Two themed sets and let Hangboy roam free across them. We’re into that kind of free spirit, so we’re awarding Hangboy our version of a Medal of Honor — he’s our Project of the Day!

    For a quick snapshot of why we love comic book character Hangboy so much, let’s reflect on his life story a moment:

    In his infancy, HANGBoY could be found defiling himself on napkins, notebook pages, whiteboards, and even beach sand. Since then he has matured (a little) and can be found immortalized on more formal media such as full color prints and sculptures. In every situation, HANGBoY’s message is clear: “Let’s play!”, as he never takes life too serious.
    Hangboy is actually so mischievous that his creator claims to be unable to control him. In fact, he alleges that all he did for his new book, Hangboy: World War Too, was to build a bunch of World War Two themed sets and let Hangboy roam free across them. We’re into that kind of free spirit, so we’re awarding Hangboy our version of a Medal of Honor — he’s our Project of the Day!
  5. A mere four months ago, artist Ray Sumser set out on the self-appointed, incredibly ambitious task of completing a 7’ x 9’ oil painting housing 2,000+ recognizable cartoon characters. He dubbed it the Cartoonum, and after some spectacular time lapse videos of his progress, it’s completed! Check out his most recent update for more, and revel in all it’s comic-cartoony-goodness above. Of the final print going to backers, he reveals: 
The image you are seeing is the result of a week of photo trials. This final version is composed of 87 stitched together images. It is over 20,000 pixels across and was a real puzzle (and headache!) to figure out. 
Impressive!

    A mere four months ago, artist Ray Sumser set out on the self-appointed, incredibly ambitious task of completing a 7’ x 9’ oil painting housing 2,000+ recognizable cartoon characters. He dubbed it the Cartoonum, and after some spectacular time lapse videos of his progress, it’s completed! Check out his most recent update for more, and revel in all it’s comic-cartoony-goodness above. Of the final print going to backers, he reveals:

    The image you are seeing is the result of a week of photo trials. This final version is composed of 87 stitched together images. It is over 20,000 pixels across and was a real puzzle (and headache!) to figure out.

    Impressive!