1. How’s the air up there?
Urban Air is an experimental bamboo forest high above a Los Angeles freeway. 
Surrounded by concrete, bad drivers, and worse advertising, the LA commute feels like the ultimate environmental disconnect. Urban Air seeks to subvert that daily alienation — one billboard at a time. The idea is pretty simple: Take disused billboards, remove the commercial facade, and install a living, breathing cloud forest of bamboo.
Time to reclaim the asphalt jungle and score one for the trees — it’s our Project of the Day.

    How’s the air up there?

    Urban Air is an experimental bamboo forest high above a Los Angeles freeway. 

    Surrounded by concrete, bad drivers, and worse advertising, the LA commute feels like the ultimate environmental disconnect. Urban Air seeks to subvert that daily alienation — one billboard at a time. The idea is pretty simple: Take disused billboards, remove the commercial facade, and install a living, breathing cloud forest of bamboo.

    Time to reclaim the asphalt jungle and score one for the trees — it’s our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Desert blooms.

    Tenement is a collective formed by three young Brooklyn artists with a shared obsession.

    After experimenting with collaborations in a variety of formats, the trio fell for the collodion tintype process of 19th-century portraiture, and an archaic love affair was born.

    Tenement just launched a new Kickstarter project to fund a documentary expedition, traveling witha  team of ecologists to survey the Mojave desert. In a nod to pioneering American naturalists such as George Englemann and Charles Wright, Tenement will make beautiful and evocative images to illustrate the ecologists’ field notes, bringing art and science together in a series of dispatches from the desert.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. A Creational Trail.
Matireal demonstrates that a simple idea can transform a local problem into a network of new possibilities. 
Environmental architect Keith Hayes began his project with a nearly unlimited resource: used tires. The goal is to connect two neighborhoods that are currently divided by a disused railroad and a six-lane road, while reusing discarded tires that litter both neighborhoods and breed those infamous Wisconsin mosquitos.
By transforming trashed tires into matireal — a geotextile infilled with gravel and sod — Hayes hopes to build an art corridor along an abandoned industrial route and connect communities together. Residents benefit; trash is recycled; private land becomes public; economic opportunties are created; and the model is proven, clearing a path for similar projects in other cities. 
How’s that for a win-win-win-win-win?

    A Creational Trail.

    Matireal demonstrates that a simple idea can transform a local problem into a network of new possibilities. 

    Environmental architect Keith Hayes began his project with a nearly unlimited resource: used tires. The goal is to connect two neighborhoods that are currently divided by a disused railroad and a six-lane road, while reusing discarded tires that litter both neighborhoods and breed those infamous Wisconsin mosquitos.

    By transforming trashed tires into matireal — a geotextile infilled with gravel and sod — Hayes hopes to build an art corridor along an abandoned industrial route and connect communities together. Residents benefit; trash is recycled; private land becomes public; economic opportunties are created; and the model is proven, clearing a path for similar projects in other cities. 

    How’s that for a win-win-win-win-win?