1. I panicked. And then I ran circles around my kitchen counter for several days straight. I had my housemate pinch me a lot, but that didn’t exactly help. I also lost all social propriety, blabbing to people on the street that I had an Eisner nomination, and being flabbergasted when they knew what that was. I suppose I don’t have the emotional tools to deal with this kind of news, and am hoping to wake up any moment, because this is just that crazy. I haven’t drawn a single panel since, ‘cause I can’t figure out what to do next with my life. Anyhow, I should get back to ogling my Google Analytics feed because I’m mesmerized by how many people are reading the novel right now.

    —Dax Tran-Caffee reacting to receiving an Eisner nomination for Failing SkyWe talked to a few nominees here

  2. All children, except one, grow up.

    Comic-book artist Renae De Liz has long adored J.M. Barrie’s Peter Panand felt that most adaptations leave far too much out.

    An award-winning illustrator and the creator of the Womanthology Kickstarter project, De Liz is turning her talents to her favorite children’s story, promising a beautifully drawn and faithful adaptation. Backers can follow her to Never Never Land and bring back a new vision of this classic tale. Peter Pan: The Graphic Novel is our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. By day, Kara Barrett is a mild-mannered graphic designer. By night, she transforms into the writer and creator of The Bargain, a meticulously conceived graphic novel with a supernatural touch.
Set in New Orleans, 1955, the story begins with Jackson Connolly, a traveling salesman stuck in a deal with the devil. This Faustian bargain is coming due, and Connolly must dive deep into the underground world of bayou magic to save himself before the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve.
Barrett’s worked her voodoo on us — The Bargain is our Project of the Day.

    By day, Kara Barrett is a mild-mannered graphic designer. By night, she transforms into the writer and creator of The Bargain, a meticulously conceived graphic novel with a supernatural touch.

    Set in New Orleans, 1955, the story begins with Jackson Connolly, a traveling salesman stuck in a deal with the devil. This Faustian bargain is coming due, and Connolly must dive deep into the underground world of bayou magic to save himself before the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve.

    Barrett’s worked her voodoo on us — The Bargain is our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  4. Second Quest is a stand-alone graphic novella inspired by the popular video game Zelda. Specifically, the disappointment that video gamers David Hellman and Tevis Thompson felt after playing one of its more recent sequels. Where was the sense of discovery? they lamented. What was left to explore? 


    Second Quest became their remedy. It tells the story of a girl growing up in the sky who begins to suspect that the legends she’s heard about her home may not be true. Her subsequent adventures will contain some familiar tropes to avid fans of Zelda, but even if you’ve never picked up a controller, you’ll still find plenty of thrills. Sound the Ocarina: Second Quest is our Project of the Day.

  5. No one is born Genghis Khan
Check out some concept art from Temujin, a new graphic novel documenting Genghis Khan’s tumultuous childhood and rise to power. The creator, Allison Smith, spent more than a year researching the legendary Mongolian emperor before launching her Kickstarter project. 
"From the beginning," Smith says, "putting together this story and making the art around it became a part of my everyday life."

    No one is born Genghis Khan

    Check out some concept art from Temujin, a new graphic novel documenting Genghis Khan’s tumultuous childhood and rise to power. The creator, Allison Smith, spent more than a year researching the legendary Mongolian emperor before launching her Kickstarter project. 

    "From the beginning," Smith says, "putting together this story and making the art around it became a part of my everyday life."

  6. Found Slides: A Life Remembered. When Michael Lyman picked up a vintage slide projector from a thrift store in Florida, he had no idea what he was in for: 80 color Kodachrome slides, relics of the previous owner, stashed in the machine’s base. The well-preserved images depicted the daily life of a family in the 1950s, cohering to form a portrait that was simple, relatable — and utterly captivating. Although Lyman had no idea who these people were, he felt connected to them.

    On a lark, he brought his search to discover the family’s identity to the internet, scanning the slides and posting them to his blog. The images resonated, and a global Star Wars costuming group that Lyman belonged to began to respond en masse. They pored over each picture, piecing together any details they could find, and gradually cobbling together a name, a history… a life.

    Now, Lyman is transforming his experience into a graphic novel. He won’t reveal the details, except to say that his journey brought about some “highly unexpected life changes,” but we hardly need to hear more. Our curiosity has been sufficiently sparked! Explore his work, and see some of the images he’s transforming into comics, on his project page. Should we take turns guessing the ending?!

  7. "A lone astronomer, packing a rifle alongside his telescope, is tracking a comet across a bleak and desolate wasteland littered with the ruins of an ancient civilization," begins the synopsis for The Astronomer, the second chapter of the first graphic novel from Austin, TX-based artists Matt Rebholz. We feel the goosebumps coming on already, and it’s no wonder: Matt’s work is wild, imaginative, and utterly dark. (His first chapter follows a disembodied bounty killer in relentless pursuit of his quarry, you can view in its entirety here. But leave the lights on.)  He describes the world he’s creating as a “hallucinatory, post-apocalpytic, cosmic Western” — which, in our words, sounds like Project of the Day.

    "A lone astronomer, packing a rifle alongside his telescope, is tracking a comet across a bleak and desolate wasteland littered with the ruins of an ancient civilization," begins the synopsis for The Astronomer, the second chapter of the first graphic novel from Austin, TX-based artists Matt Rebholz. We feel the goosebumps coming on already, and it’s no wonder: Matt’s work is wild, imaginative, and utterly dark. (His first chapter follows a disembodied bounty killer in relentless pursuit of his quarry, you can view in its entirety here. But leave the lights on.) He describes the world he’s creating as a “hallucinatory, post-apocalpytic, cosmic Western” — which, in our words, sounds like Project of the Day.

  8. If you’ve ever wanted to read about a dinosaur with a beaver tale and his best friend Bill$ Murray, you are in luck. Marcos Perez has given you just that, and he calls it Carl’s Large Story! It’s 172 pages of awesome adventure featuring spies, vampires, giants, and —duh! — lots and lots of Carl. We like that Marcos is willing to do cool things for your pledge, like make you a crochet Carl doll. So we made him our Project of the Day.

    If you’ve ever wanted to read about a dinosaur with a beaver tale and his best friend Bill$ Murray, you are in luck. Marcos Perez has given you just that, and he calls it Carl’s Large Story! It’s 172 pages of awesome adventure featuring spies, vampires, giants, and —duh! — lots and lots of Carl. We like that Marcos is willing to do cool things for your pledge, like make you a crochet Carl doll. So we made him our Project of the Day.