1. When good tech goes bad.

    GLI.TC/H is about what happens when technologies begin to break. 

    A free, open festival of tinkerers, hackers, artists, writers, and coders based in Chicago but active worldwide, GLI.TC/H brings curiosity and humor to the search for truth in failure. Inspired by the unintentional absurdity of digital hiccups, the artists behind the festival hacked their Kickstarter project page, transforming it into an appropriately glitchy mess.

    The team’s current Kickstarter project will help fund this year’s festival, from Dec. 6-9. Do not adjust your screen — GLI.TC/H is our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Do not adjust your screen.
GLI.TC/H is about what happens when technologies begin to break. 
A free, open festival of tinkerers, hackers, artists, writers, and coders based in Chicagoland but active worldwide, GLI.TC/H brings curiosity and humor to the search for truth in failure. Inspired by the unintentional absurdity of digital hiccups, the artists behind the festival hacked their Kickstarter project page, transforming it into an appropriately glitchy mess.
This year’s US festival runs from Dec. 6-9 in Chicago.

    Do not adjust your screen.

    GLI.TC/H is about what happens when technologies begin to break. 

    A free, open festival of tinkerers, hackers, artists, writers, and coders based in Chicagoland but active worldwide, GLI.TC/H brings curiosity and humor to the search for truth in failure. Inspired by the unintentional absurdity of digital hiccups, the artists behind the festival hacked their Kickstarter project page, transforming it into an appropriately glitchy mess.

    This year’s US festival runs from Dec. 6-9 in Chicago.

  3. GEMSI is an organization committed to the spread of maker and hacker initiatives across the globe. Rooted in the belief that DIY technology empowers people in struggling communities, GEMSI partnered with a young Beirut-based creator named Bilal Ghalib to launch a project in Baghdad. 
Ghalib turned to Kickstarter to fund a pilot project in Iraq and raised nearly $30,000 just over a month ago. Yesterday, he shared a project update live from Baghdad to report back on the project’s progress.
The funding allowed Ghalib and his Iraqi collaborators to transform a local café into a pop-up hackerspace, organize workshops on everything from 3D printing to e-textiles, and even create a panoramic Google street view for a downtown park that has long been isolated by nearly a decade of war.
Congratulations to Ghalib and GEMSI on what sounds like a seriously inspiring week in a very difficult place.

    GEMSI is an organization committed to the spread of maker and hacker initiatives across the globe. Rooted in the belief that DIY technology empowers people in struggling communities, GEMSI partnered with a young Beirut-based creator named Bilal Ghalib to launch a project in Baghdad. 

    Ghalib turned to Kickstarter to fund a pilot project in Iraq and raised nearly $30,000 just over a month ago. Yesterday, he shared a project update live from Baghdad to report back on the project’s progress.

    The funding allowed Ghalib and his Iraqi collaborators to transform a local café into a pop-up hackerspace, organize workshops on everything from 3D printing to e-textiles, and even create a panoramic Google street view for a downtown park that has long been isolated by nearly a decade of war.

    Congratulations to Ghalib and GEMSI on what sounds like a seriously inspiring week in a very difficult place.