1. The old-fashioned way.
Ukiyo-e Heroes (浮世絵ヒーロー)breaks down the anatomy of a Japanese woodblock print in their latest project update. Looks beautiful — and exhausting!
jedhenry:

Anatomy of a Woodblock Print
Printing begins soon!
You can order your print here:
http://www.ukiyoeheroes.com/products-page/woodblock/the-hero-rests-woodblock-print/

    The old-fashioned way.

    Ukiyo-e Heroes (浮世絵ヒーロー)breaks down the anatomy of a Japanese woodblock print in their latest project update. Looks beautiful — and exhausting!

    jedhenry:

    Anatomy of a Woodblock Print

    Printing begins soon!

    You can order your print here:

    http://www.ukiyoeheroes.com/products-page/woodblock/the-hero-rests-woodblock-print/

    View on Kickstarter
  2. America’s first ramen tasting menu.

    Like a culinary nomad, chef Yuji Haraguchi has been slinging his delicious ramen all over NYC. After honing his craft in the back of a bar and at street-side stalls, this soup wizard is ready to kick it up a notch. Yuji is creating a pop-up "omakase" ramen restaurant, where his seasonal and experimental takes on the Japanese staple will be offered as a tasting menu for the first time in the States.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. 8-bit till dawn.

    Nubuwo Winter Bundle is a new Kickstarter project that shares the best of Fami-Mode, Tokyo’s infamous all-night festival of videogame music.

    Highlights include Professor Sakamoto, an 8-bit madman who performs with a Nintendo cartridge strapped to his head, and Ben Prunty, the composer behind acclaimed Kickstarter-funded game Faster Than Light.

    View on Kickstarter
  4. Print party.

    Of all the enticing backer rewards for Ukiyo-e Heroes, one was unique: A “print party” at master printmaker David Bull’s studio in Ome City, Tokyo.

    Two backers just visited last week and and project’s creators shared their story. Bull’s narrow home studio, perched on a grassy hill, seems like a surreal oasis of calm amid the world’s largest metropolis.

    View on Kickstarter
  5. After Fukushima.
Since Newsmotion's Kickstarter project ended last December, the media storytelling site has published six in-depth, feature-length articles that approach journalism from a civic perspective, exploring the ins and outs of humanity's relationship with the world.
Newsmotion’s sixth published piece is written by Josh Price, who is also in the middle of producing a new documentary via Kickstarter, cpm-730, which finds him examining the community adjacent to Japan’s Fukushima power plant after the nuclear meltdown.
While the film approaches the subject through the eyes of artist Shimpei Takeda, Price’s piece for Newsmotion, entitled “The Children of Fukushima,” chronicles the altered lives of kids growing up in the post-nuclear city, who now can only go outside for three hours a day — and only with a geiger counter in hand. 

    After Fukushima.

    Since Newsmotion's Kickstarter project ended last December, the media storytelling site has published six in-depth, feature-length articles that approach journalism from a civic perspective, exploring the ins and outs of humanity's relationship with the world.

    Newsmotion’s sixth published piece is written by Josh Price, who is also in the middle of producing a new documentary via Kickstarter, cpm-730, which finds him examining the community adjacent to Japan’s Fukushima power plant after the nuclear meltdown.

    While the film approaches the subject through the eyes of artist Shimpei Takeda, Price’s piece for Newsmotion, entitled “The Children of Fukushima,” chronicles the altered lives of kids growing up in the post-nuclear city, who now can only go outside for three hours a day — and only with a geiger counter in hand. 

  6. 3 days left for BLIND, the feature film that “imagines a parallel-universe version of Japan which also suffered a nuclear crisis but was less lucky than its real world counterpart. It’s a place where fallout readings are a part of the weather forecast and gas masks are as ubiquitous as black suits and Gucci bags.” Peep this sweet interview with BLIND's director and producer in Time Out Tokyo.

    3 days left for BLIND, the feature film that “imagines a parallel-universe version of Japan which also suffered a nuclear crisis but was less lucky than its real world counterpart. It’s a place where fallout readings are a part of the weather forecast and gas masks are as ubiquitous as black suits and Gucci bags.” Peep this sweet interview with BLIND's director and producer in Time Out Tokyo.