1. max-clyde:

It Took Seven Years To Make An Indie RPG So Good-Looking
Its creator started working on Platformer/RPG Heart Forth, Alicia in 2007. The result is an aesthetically beautiful game with a complex story, a detailed world and what looks to be pretty damn fun gameplay. Sadly, it’s still not done.P
Inspired by the likes of Zelda, Xenogears and Castlevania (Symphony of the Night, specifically), Heart Forth, Alicia recounts tale of a young wizard-slash-warrior girl trying to save the world from ultimate evil.
On top of that, we’ve got the familiar metroidvania-RPG fare: a large, connected world, steady character progression, loot, side quests, crafting, and so on. There’s a little bit of that in the trailer above, if you can notice it while you’re gawking at the art.P
As I mentioned, the game is still unfinished, which is why it was put on Kickstarter—it already managed to collect over $3,000 in just four hours, impressively enough. That’s five percent funding. In four hours. I foresee a bright future for this one. Should the campaign succeed,Heart Forth, Alicia is promised to arrive on PC in one year, in May 2015.P
Heart Forth, Alicia [Kickstarter]

Kotaku on Heart Forth, Alicia! 

    max-clyde:

    It Took Seven Years To Make An Indie RPG So Good-Looking

    Its creator started working on Platformer/RPG Heart Forth, Alicia in 2007. The result is an aesthetically beautiful game with a complex story, a detailed world and what looks to be pretty damn fun gameplay. Sadly, it’s still not done.P

    Inspired by the likes of Zelda, Xenogears and Castlevania (Symphony of the Night, specifically), Heart Forth, Alicia recounts tale of a young wizard-slash-warrior girl trying to save the world from ultimate evil.

    On top of that, we’ve got the familiar metroidvania-RPG fare: a large, connected world, steady character progression, loot, side quests, crafting, and so on. There’s a little bit of that in the trailer above, if you can notice it while you’re gawking at the art.P

    As I mentioned, the game is still unfinished, which is why it was put on Kickstarter—it already managed to collect over $3,000 in just four hours, impressively enough. That’s five percent funding. In four hours. I foresee a bright future for this one. Should the campaign succeed,Heart Forth, Alicia is promised to arrive on PC in one year, in May 2015.P

    Heart Forth, Alicia [Kickstarter]

    Kotaku on Heart Forth, Alicia

    View on Kickstarter
  2. If you’ve ever planned on sending postcards while on a trip, only to end up staring at the daunting blank space on the back of the card, agonizing over how, exactly, you’ll fill it, then A Memory Between Us postcard kit, our Project of the Day, is right up your alley. Here’s a set of postcards designed for you and your traveling companion to fill out to track your unique perspective on the same trip.

    If you’ve ever planned on sending postcards while on a trip, only to end up staring at the daunting blank space on the back of the card, agonizing over how, exactly, you’ll fill it, then A Memory Between Us postcard kit, our Project of the Day, is right up your alley. Here’s a set of postcards designed for you and your traveling companion to fill out to track your unique perspective on the same trip.

  3. My experience here at Kickstarter has been life-changing. After banging my head against the walls of venture capitalism for almost three years, dealing with business experts who didn’t understand what we were trying to accomplish; rescue the art of recorded sound and make great music available into the future, I found you people. You are the ones who understand what this is. You have proven it with your amazing support.

    Neil Young on running a Kickstarter. His Pono project just ended today, with the support of 18,220 backers! 

  4. leebarguss:

    Rachel Sussman documents The Oldest Living Things In The World

    1) Antarctic Moss, (5,500 years old; Elephant Island, Antarctica)
    2) La Llareta (Up to 3,000 years old; Atacama Desert, Chile)
    3) Spruce Gran Picea (9,550 years old; Sweden)
    4) underground Forest (+3,000 years old; Pretoria, South Africa) DECEASED
    5) Dead Huon Pine adjacent to living Population segment (10,500 years old; Mount Read, Tansania)
    6) Jōmon Sugi, Japanese Cedar (2,180-7,000 years old; Jaku Shima, Japan)

    VIDEO

    Rachel Sussman’s book, which was a project in 2010, had its official launch yesterday! 

    View on Kickstarter
  5. Mex and the City is an online collective and creative agency based in New York. One of its founders, Marina Garcia-Vasquez, wanted to create a tangible glimpse of the “new global Mexican identity,” so she, along with photographer Carlos Alvarez Montero and other contributors, put together Racial Profiling. The book collects photos and profiles of Mexicans in New York and elsewhere, along with interviews and photos of the work they’re producing, with the goal of showing the diversity of contemporary Mexican identity.

Why did you decide to put this book together?

We first started Racial Profiling as an editorial to build out our online community for Mex And The City. I always knew I wanted to have authentic portraits that celebrated individualism, but it wasn’t until I met the photographer Carlos Alvarez Montero in person and we spoke about ideas of identity that Racial Profiling was born. Since then we’ve hit Mexico City and Los Angeles to represent current culture. The book project is at once a photo art book, an homage to these large cities, and a recognition of the relationship between Mexico and the United States. 

How did you decide who would make it into the book—are there any thematic ties?

Thematically, we curated the portraits with individuals whose work has them moving between cities. We found that many NY Mexicans went back and forth between Mexico and California for work. We wanted to acknowledge that movement. This is how the idea of the new global Mexican identity came about.

Did the idea for the book arrive fully formed, or did it start to take shape as you accumulated profiles?

When we first started the project, everyone asked what our goals were. If we were going to publish a book or develop the series into an exhibit? Because we are more of an art collective, we always agreed that it would be an organic movement through time. And because producing the portraits is actually a lot of work!

This book is just one facet of a larger project. Could you talk more about that?

Racial Profiling, the portrait series, is the basis for Mex and the City developing real community and marking our identity as a brand. We are now a creative agency and a movement. Our goals are to promote a contemporary Mexican identity through arts, culture, and design. 

You describe this book as a “tool for communication.” What would you like to communicate?

Most of our work is found online as a blog or events captured by photos or video. We are a digital community but wanted to create something tangible and timeless, something you could find in bookstores or in a library. The book as a tool for communication is a means to show that migration does not have to be taboo, that there is strength in individual passions, and that as a culture and collective we contribute beautiful work to society. 

Will the book be similar to the profiles on the site? 

Yes the book will feature the portraits by Carlos Alvarez Montero on the site as well as newer collections not yet published. It will contain intro essays and Q&As. But I am also very excited to include a catalog section to show individual creator output. So that when we feature an artist, a hotelier, and a scientist we also have an example of their work to refer to: a piece of art, a designed hotel, a theoretical module. It’s an art catalog and historical record. 

    Mex and the City is an online collective and creative agency based in New York. One of its founders, Marina Garcia-Vasquez, wanted to create a tangible glimpse of the “new global Mexican identity,” so she, along with photographer Carlos Alvarez Montero and other contributors, put together Racial ProfilingThe book collects photos and profiles of Mexicans in New York and elsewhere, along with interviews and photos of the work they’re producing, with the goal of showing the diversity of contemporary Mexican identity.

    Why did you decide to put this book together?

    We first started Racial Profiling as an editorial to build out our online community for Mex And The City. I always knew I wanted to have authentic portraits that celebrated individualism, but it wasn’t until I met the photographer Carlos Alvarez Montero in person and we spoke about ideas of identity that Racial Profiling was born. Since then we’ve hit Mexico City and Los Angeles to represent current culture. The book project is at once a photo art book, an homage to these large cities, and a recognition of the relationship between Mexico and the United States. 

    How did you decide who would make it into the book—are there any thematic ties?

    Thematically, we curated the portraits with individuals whose work has them moving between cities. We found that many NY Mexicans went back and forth between Mexico and California for work. We wanted to acknowledge that movement. This is how the idea of the new global Mexican identity came about.

    Did the idea for the book arrive fully formed, or did it start to take shape as you accumulated profiles?

    When we first started the project, everyone asked what our goals were. If we were going to publish a book or develop the series into an exhibit? Because we are more of an art collective, we always agreed that it would be an organic movement through time. And because producing the portraits is actually a lot of work!

    This book is just one facet of a larger project. Could you talk more about that?

    Racial Profiling, the portrait series, is the basis for Mex and the City developing real community and marking our identity as a brand. We are now a creative agency and a movement. Our goals are to promote a contemporary Mexican identity through arts, culture, and design. 

    You describe this book as a “tool for communication.” What would you like to communicate?

    Most of our work is found online as a blog or events captured by photos or video. We are a digital community but wanted to create something tangible and timeless, something you could find in bookstores or in a library. The book as a tool for communication is a means to show that migration does not have to be taboo, that there is strength in individual passions, and that as a culture and collective we contribute beautiful work to society. 

    Will the book be similar to the profiles on the site? 

    Yes the book will feature the portraits by Carlos Alvarez Montero on the site as well as newer collections not yet published. It will contain intro essays and Q&As. But I am also very excited to include a catalog section to show individual creator output. So that when we feature an artist, a hotelier, and a scientist we also have an example of their work to refer to: a piece of art, a designed hotel, a theoretical module. It’s an art catalog and historical record. 

  6. Octavio Pardo is a type designer from Spain. He created a set of five typefaces intended for protest signs, pictured above, and is now running a project to help make them universally available. The specificity and design-oriented approach piqued our interest, so we asked Octavio some questions.
Could you talk a bit about your design background in general?
I started as a graphic designer working in different studios in Barcelona. One day, one of my Art Directors told me: “You are a badass graphic designer, but you have no idea about type.” Since I am very stubborn, that day I decided I would learn as much as I could about typography. I ended up studying type design in England and then working for some of the most talented type designers in the world. Nowadays I freelance as a graphic designer and do type design projects as I seek true happiness :)

What are the characteristics of a good typeface?
There are two levels to judging a typeface. First, how interesting is the design? Second, how well is that design implemented throughout the entire piece of work? Since everything that matters in typography is quite subtle, it’s hard to tell if a typeface is well done if you don’t know where and how to look. But in the end, when you are looking at it, reading it, or using it in the right way, a good typeface makes things look great!

What attracted you to protest signage in particular?
Since I was very young, I was always amazed by protest images, both amateur ones and ones made by designers. They are pieces of communication that most of time seek to make an impact through the message, not through spectacular visual compositions. The concept goes straight to the mind. The work done by Adbusters, Jonathan Barnbrook… those are the reasons why I became a type designer.

Do you have personal history with protests?
During the first two years of the spanish recession, I was seeing my friends losing their jobs, my brother and sister having a very bad time, cases of corruption in the government every week on the news. Almost every time you turned on the TV you could see people striking and protesting, all over the country. I feel like doing something, but didn’t know what to do. That weight in my chest turned into a trigger for my creativity. I guess that is the feeling behind any emotional piece of art, but I’m not an artist, I am a graphic designer and a type designer. 
I am cautious about joining protests in general. The reason is that most of the information that the citizens get to establish their criteria comes from the media, and I simply do not trust the media anymore. They are aligned with political parties, not with the people. Without reliable information I hate to take positions on any idea. The people, I trust them.        

What are your future plans for this project?
First of all, I will finish it the way I want it to be. That still means a lot of work, especially [the typeface] “Revolution.” I am also negotiating with a big company to create companions for the fonts in different scripts; that would make it a really universal tool. And once the project is launched and finished, I want to add two more fonts to it. These are different but related ideas within the Tiananmen concept.

    Octavio Pardo is a type designer from Spain. He created a set of five typefaces intended for protest signs, pictured above, and is now running a project to help make them universally available. The specificity and design-oriented approach piqued our interest, so we asked Octavio some questions.

    Could you talk a bit about your design background in general?

    I started as a graphic designer working in different studios in Barcelona. One day, one of my Art Directors told me: “You are a badass graphic designer, but you have no idea about type.” Since I am very stubborn, that day I decided I would learn as much as I could about typography. I ended up studying type design in England and then working for some of the most talented type designers in the world. Nowadays I freelance as a graphic designer and do type design projects as I seek true happiness :)

    What are the characteristics of a good typeface?

    There are two levels to judging a typeface. First, how interesting is the design? Second, how well is that design implemented throughout the entire piece of work? Since everything that matters in typography is quite subtle, it’s hard to tell if a typeface is well done if you don’t know where and how to look. But in the end, when you are looking at it, reading it, or using it in the right way, a good typeface makes things look great!

    What attracted you to protest signage in particular?

    Since I was very young, I was always amazed by protest images, both amateur ones and ones made by designers. They are pieces of communication that most of time seek to make an impact through the message, not through spectacular visual compositions. The concept goes straight to the mind. The work done by Adbusters, Jonathan Barnbrook… those are the reasons why I became a type designer.

    Do you have personal history with protests?

    During the first two years of the spanish recession, I was seeing my friends losing their jobs, my brother and sister having a very bad time, cases of corruption in the government every week on the news. Almost every time you turned on the TV you could see people striking and protesting, all over the country. I feel like doing something, but didn’t know what to do. That weight in my chest turned into a trigger for my creativity. I guess that is the feeling behind any emotional piece of art, but I’m not an artist, I am a graphic designer and a type designer. 

    I am cautious about joining protests in general. The reason is that most of the information that the citizens get to establish their criteria comes from the media, and I simply do not trust the media anymore. They are aligned with political parties, not with the people. Without reliable information I hate to take positions on any idea. The people, I trust them.        

    What are your future plans for this project?

    First of all, I will finish it the way I want it to be. That still means a lot of work, especially [the typeface] “Revolution.” I am also negotiating with a big company to create companions for the fonts in different scripts; that would make it a really universal tool. And once the project is launched and finished, I want to add two more fonts to it. These are different but related ideas within the Tiananmen concept.