1. 150 Years Underground is a collection of 150 portraits of Londoners at 150 different Tube stations, and it commemorates 150 years of the London Underground. Now, it’s up for public viewing at Camden Collective until March 10th!

    We love this pic from the hanging of the exhibition, and even if you can’t make it to Camden, you can see more pictures at the Facebook page

  2. We’re super excited to bring the Kickstarter Film Fest to London this Saturday! We originally held the event in Brooklyn this past summer, and it was such a success we had to bring it across the pond!
We’ll be showing selections from some of our favorite Kickstarter-funded films, including Style Wars, Portrait of Jason, and Bill Plympton’s Cheatin’! 
A free afternoon at the cinema, what more could you ask for! RSVP here. 

    We’re super excited to bring the Kickstarter Film Fest to London this Saturday! We originally held the event in Brooklyn this past summer, and it was such a success we had to bring it across the pond!

    We’ll be showing selections from some of our favorite Kickstarter-funded films, including Style Wars, Portrait of Jason, and Bill Plympton’s Cheatin’

    A free afternoon at the cinema, what more could you ask for! RSVP here

  3. Robert Montgomery writes poems, but instead of publishing them on paper, he presents them to the public in the form of large light installations or billboards. He never signs his work, but his style is so distinctive as to declare his authorship immediately. Regardless, it’s clear that his emphasis lies elsewhere — on us, the audience. His goal seems to be to make us stop in our tracks (check), and to make us look at things in a little bit of a different light (double check). Luckily, we no longer have to be in London to benefit from the fluorescent glow of one of his lovely verses, because some fans of his work are making it into a book. We can’t wait!

    Robert Montgomery writes poems, but instead of publishing them on paper, he presents them to the public in the form of large light installations or billboards. He never signs his work, but his style is so distinctive as to declare his authorship immediately. Regardless, it’s clear that his emphasis lies elsewhere — on us, the audience. His goal seems to be to make us stop in our tracks (check), and to make us look at things in a little bit of a different light (double check). Luckily, we no longer have to be in London to benefit from the fluorescent glow of one of his lovely verses, because some fans of his work are making it into a book. We can’t wait!