1. The Atlantic's Cities blog just published a thoughtful piece on Food: An Atlas, the cartography project by Berkeley professor Darin Jensen and former student — and freelance cartographer — Molly  Roy. 
The duo is mapping food consumption, distribution, and production and has created over 60 maps showing off the work, such as the Farmer’s Market Accessibility Map (above), which depicts the distribution of farmers markets throughout the country. 
The guerilla cartographers shared a few more maps with The Atlantic, highlighting such things as everyday eating habits of the eastern Mediterranean, and meat production and consumption in Maryland. Check them out here. 

    The Atlantic's Cities blog just published a thoughtful piece on Food: An Atlas, the cartography project by Berkeley professor Darin Jensen and former student — and freelance cartographer — Molly  Roy.

    The duo is mapping food consumption, distribution, and production and has created over 60 maps showing off the work, such as the Farmer’s Market Accessibility Map (above), which depicts the distribution of farmers markets throughout the country.

    The guerilla cartographers shared a few more maps with The Atlantic, highlighting such things as everyday eating habits of the eastern Mediterranean, and meat production and consumption in Maryland. Check them out here

    View on Kickstarter
  2. World of explorers.

    OpenROV is an open source submersible robot, designed to facilitate DIY underwater exploration. This handsome little fellow can rotate, change depth, and descend at least 65 feet — all powered by regular C batteries.

    The project blew through its funding goals this summer, raising over $100,000 on Kickstarter. Now the creators have released a map of the global OpenROV community as they prepare to ship backers’ kits out, revealing a network of underwater explorers on six continents. 

    We’re looking forward to a slew of aquatic discoveries from around the world next year, as OpenROVers dive below the surface to explore the other 70% of our planet.