1. A few Kickstarter-funded films currently in theaters, including a Sundance award-winner, a NY Times Critics’ Pick, and one with a 4 star review from the Guardian. A great weekend to hit the cinema!

  2. snaphotdogs:

    Snapshots from last night’s Kickstarter Film Festival in Brooklyn. We were way too busy grilling dogs to take any photos of our own, but here’s a few we found on Instagram. It was a beeeeautiful summer night, and thanks SO much to everyone who came out and to Kickstarter for hosting a kick-ass party.

    Photo cred to @asiajanus, @lisinhajam, @kickstarter, @davesnyder

    Love these photos from the 3rd annual Kickstarter Film Fest! Thanks to everyone who came! We can’t wait to do it again. In the meantime, if you’ve got photos, share them with us here

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Big winners at Sundance.
Good morning, internet. Exciting news out of Sundance: Kickstarter-funded doc Blood Brother wins big at the prestigous festival, taking home both the U.S. Grand Jury Prize for Documentary and the Audience Award for U.S. Documentary. Incredible!
Blood Brother wasn’t the only Kickstarter success story at the festival. Of the 17 films that played, The Square won the Audience Award for World Cinema and This Is Martin Bonner won the Audience Award: Best of NEXT. Inequality for All and American Promise also took home special jury prizes.
Congrats to all the filmmakers and backers who made these films possible!

    Big winners at Sundance.

    Good morning, internet. Exciting news out of Sundance: Kickstarter-funded doc Blood Brother wins big at the prestigous festival, taking home both the U.S. Grand Jury Prize for Documentary and the Audience Award for U.S. Documentary. Incredible!

    Blood Brother wasn’t the only Kickstarter success story at the festival. Of the 17 films that played, The Square won the Audience Award for World Cinema and This Is Martin Bonner won the Audience Award: Best of NEXT. Inequality for All and American Promise also took home special jury prizes.

    Congrats to all the filmmakers and backers who made these films possible!

  4. Sunset for the silver screen.

    Carl Weese is a man on a mission: For over a decade, he’s been making photographs of the last drive-in movie theaters in America. 

    From a peak of more than 4,000 screens in 1958, these formerly iconic sites of fantasy and romance have dwindled in all 50 states. Now, just 466 drive-ins remain, with more closing each season.

    At the confluence of Hollywood myth-making and American car culture, the drive-in serves as a powerful symbol of both optimism and decay. After funding the final phase of his enormous undertaking on Kickstarter last spring, Weese has just returned home from his long-awaited trip to the South — just hours ahead of Hurricane Sandy. 

    We’re looking forward to haunting new images from Weese’s road trips in the weeks ahead.