1. Project of the Day—Kronos Quartet founder David Harrington is a pretty notable guy, and the David Harrington Research and Development Fund is just another iteration of some of the amazing music he’s brought into the world, both directly and indirectly.
The idea is that the fund helps “fully realize projects that might not otherwise be possible. When it is your mission to create and perform groundbreaking work, sometimes you need to act quickly to make projects happen now, rather than lose an opportunity.” In the last eight years alone, the fund has commissioned nearly 50 new works — this project will focus on four of them. 

    Project of the Day—Kronos Quartet founder David Harrington is a pretty notable guy, and the David Harrington Research and Development Fund is just another iteration of some of the amazing music he’s brought into the world, both directly and indirectly.

    The idea is that the fund helps “fully realize projects that might not otherwise be possible. When it is your mission to create and perform groundbreaking work, sometimes you need to act quickly to make projects happen now, rather than lose an opportunity.” In the last eight years alone, the fund has commissioned nearly 50 new works — this project will focus on four of them. 

  2. Project of the Day—Moondog was a legendary street musician who managed to transcend every single idea about what it means to be a street musician. For years, he played in New York on 6th avenue and 54th street, and his fans ranged from Philip Glass (who lived with him) to Jarvis Cocker to Elvis Costello. Stylistically and musically, he was a massive influence on a large swath of of art we see and hear today. The documentary, The Viking of 6th Avenue, explores Moondog’s lasting legacy by talking to the people that were most inspired by him.

    Project of the Day—Moondog was a legendary street musician who managed to transcend every single idea about what it means to be a street musician. For years, he played in New York on 6th avenue and 54th street, and his fans ranged from Philip Glass (who lived with him) to Jarvis Cocker to Elvis Costello. Stylistically and musically, he was a massive influence on a large swath of of art we see and hear today. The documentary, The Viking of 6th Avenue, explores Moondog’s lasting legacy by talking to the people that were most inspired by him.

  3. As influential as the early iteration of the indie rock scene was (think bands like Jesus & Mary Chain, Shop Assistants, the Wedding Present and really the entire C86 compilation), there’s never been a cohesive document of the lasting impression the scene made on music today. Author Neil Taylor, who also helped compile the compilation mentioned above, is rectifying that with C86 & All That: Indie 1983-1986, our Project of the Day.

    As influential as the early iteration of the indie rock scene was (think bands like Jesus & Mary Chain, Shop Assistants, the Wedding Present and really the entire C86 compilation), there’s never been a cohesive document of the lasting impression the scene made on music today. Author Neil Taylor, who also helped compile the compilation mentioned above, is rectifying that with C86 & All That: Indie 1983-1986, our Project of the Day.

  4. The art that comes from the punk scene is typically confrontational and disturbing and shakes people free from habitual thought and falling back into unquestioning ideology. That’s not to forget the strong feminist message within the movement. We are in no doubt that there are deeply philosophical ideas that sit beneath punk, and it’s our view that this is why punk has had such massive influence.

    —From our interview with the creators of the book The Truth of Revolution, Brother, which talks about the philosophy of the punk movement. Read the rest here.

  5. Project of the Day—Reissuing a band’s earlier work is a noble endeavor all on its own, but doing it so lovingly is a whole other thing. Writer and musician Hank Shteamer wants to bring three lost classics from Cleveland band Craw back into the conversation. See lots of press about the project here, read our interview with Shteamer about the band here, and check out the project page right here. 

    Project of the Day—Reissuing a band’s earlier work is a noble endeavor all on its own, but doing it so lovingly is a whole other thing. Writer and musician Hank Shteamer wants to bring three lost classics from Cleveland band Craw back into the conversation. See lots of press about the project here, read our interview with Shteamer about the band here, and check out the project page right here