1. Rebirth of the cool.

    Freelance photographer Robert Campbell captured jazz in bloom. As a young man in New York City in the ’50s and ’60s, Campbell photographed legends in the making, including iconic images of John Coltrane, Chuck Berry, Art Blakey, and the Modern Jazz Quartet.

    Saddled with debt and suffering from mental illness, Campbell retreated from public view with his entire life’s work in tow. He spent the rest of his life in Burlington, Vermont living in obscurity — his images largely forgotten — until his death in 2001.

    Photographer Jessica Ferber is trying to write a new ending to this sad tale. Having come across Campbell’s astonishing archive nearly a decade ago, Ferber has spent years working to bring his images into the public eye. She recently launched a Kickstarter project to fund the publication of a complete retrospective — marking the first public presentation of Campbell’s work since it was created half a century ago.

  2. A grower’s life goes to pot.
It’s been a big week for weed. Last week, Colorado and Washington voted to legalize marijuana, while Massachusetts voters approved medical cannabis. The passage of these ballot initiatives marks the latest in a string of victories for drug-policy reform on the state level.
However, despite major shifts in both public opinion and state law, the federal government continues to prosecute marijuana growers as felons. As the gap between federal and state drug laws widens, pot growers are increasingly vulnerable. In the case of a Montana grower named Chris Williams, that legal contradiction could put him in prison for the rest of his life.
Code of the West is a documentary about Williams, a single father and marijuana farmer whose facility conformed to Montana state law. After a federal raid shut down his operation, Williams now finds himself facing 80 years in prison.
Filmmaker and journalist Rebecca Richman Cohen just updated her Kickstarter backers with an Op-Doc video from the New York Times, detailing the story behind her film and introducing viewers to Williams. Since posting the video last week, her work has been retweeted by politicians, rockers, and a porn star — drawing some valuable attention to her Kickstarter project. There are still 22 days left to help fund Cohen’s work and spread the story of a Montana farmer and his ultimate fate.

    A grower’s life goes to pot.

    It’s been a big week for weed. Last week, Colorado and Washington voted to legalize marijuana, while Massachusetts voters approved medical cannabis. The passage of these ballot initiatives marks the latest in a string of victories for drug-policy reform on the state level.

    However, despite major shifts in both public opinion and state law, the federal government continues to prosecute marijuana growers as felons. As the gap between federal and state drug laws widens, pot growers are increasingly vulnerable. In the case of a Montana grower named Chris Williams, that legal contradiction could put him in prison for the rest of his life.

    Code of the West is a documentary about Williams, a single father and marijuana farmer whose facility conformed to Montana state law. After a federal raid shut down his operation, Williams now finds himself facing 80 years in prison.

    Filmmaker and journalist Rebecca Richman Cohen just updated her Kickstarter backers with an Op-Doc video from the New York Times, detailing the story behind her film and introducing viewers to Williams. Since posting the video last week, her work has been retweeted by politicians, rockers, and a porn star — drawing some valuable attention to her Kickstarter project. There are still 22 days left to help fund Cohen’s work and spread the story of a Montana farmer and his ultimate fate.

  3. A recipe for Of Montreal.

    Start with at least a dozen bandmates. Add liberal sprinklings of psychedelic rock, vaudeville, afrobeat, techno, and folk music. Whisk in a trunkload of glitter, a pinch of nudity, the occasional horse, and more than a dozen records, then bake at 5000 degrees for 16 years.

    What pops out of the oven is one of the world’s strangest and most inventive pop bands — and a testament to the potential of independent music. Through a rare combination of constant sonic reinvention and outrageous showmanship, Of Montreal have built a massive following while never putting out a single conventional hit.

    Of Montreal’s new Kickstarter project, Song Dynasties, is the band’s first feature-length documentary. Spiced with years of all-access footage — including never-before-seen tapes from deep in the attic — the film will provide an inimitable portrait of a band in its prime. Fans take note: Backers have first dibs on a smorgasbord of rare swag, including paper lanterns, test pressings, and vinyl galore. Dig in.

  4. Sisterhood is powerful.

    She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry is the first feature documentary about the birth of the women’s liberation movement.

    A personal exploration of the tumultuous ’60s as told by the women on the front lines, the film seeks to memorialize a pivotal moment for women’s rights while drawing direct linkages to ongoing struggles in the present day.

    Fierce, funny, inspiring, and pissed off, these women re-imagined sisterhood for a new era and transformed protest into a paradigm shift. Created by two award-winning filmmakers, this doc is now seeking finishing funds through a Kickstarter campaign.

  5. Down in the dumps.

    RAIR is an artist residency program born and raised in a junkyard. 

    RAIR takes advantage of a unique opportunity to grant artists direct access to the waste stream — turning trash into treasure in the process. Housed in a Philadelphia recycling center, the program develops new work sourced from found materials and encourages artists to return completed projects to be recycled once again.

    Previous residents have rigged sails from forklifts, constructed houses from heating ducts,  and published a taxonomy of trash. Future refuse reuse is just a little funding away — that’s why RAIR is our Project of the Day.

  6. Off the grid.
Macro Micro is an experimental architecture lab committed to reducing the environmental footprint of new buildings through technology and design.
A project of the University of Dundee in Scotland, Macro Micro’s current endeavor is an energy-neutral studio designed for the city’s Botanic Gardens. The student-led team has finished designing the structure and has turned to Kickstarter to raise about a third of the necessary funding. If successful, the studio will be the first off-grid, carbon-neutral project to be designed and built in the UK.

    Off the grid.

    Macro Micro is an experimental architecture lab committed to reducing the environmental footprint of new buildings through technology and design.

    A project of the University of Dundee in Scotland, Macro Micro’s current endeavor is an energy-neutral studio designed for the city’s Botanic Gardens. The student-led team has finished designing the structure and has turned to Kickstarter to raise about a third of the necessary funding. If successful, the studio will be the first off-grid, carbon-neutral project to be designed and built in the UK.

  7. Vinyl nerds, rejoice.
iCrates is an online magazine devoted to the world of music on wax. With contributions from every wavelength of the musical spectrum, the magazine celebrates rare finds, unsung heroes, and new jams in equal measure.
The creators have produced iCrates from Berlin for the past two years, gathering contributions from across the globe to produce their web-only magazine. But given the site’s focus on vinyl culture, it only seems fitting that the digital publication would finally end up in print.
The team’s new Kickstarter project seeks the funds to produce the iCrates Annual, a high-quality print mag celebrating the past year in musical archaeology. Backers can look forward to exclusive vinyl-only mixes for supporting the project, which will sound pretty sweet — even if they’re jamming on your iPod.

    Vinyl nerds, rejoice.

    iCrates is an online magazine devoted to the world of music on wax. With contributions from every wavelength of the musical spectrum, the magazine celebrates rare finds, unsung heroes, and new jams in equal measure.

    The creators have produced iCrates from Berlin for the past two years, gathering contributions from across the globe to produce their web-only magazine. But given the site’s focus on vinyl culture, it only seems fitting that the digital publication would finally end up in print.

    The team’s new Kickstarter project seeks the funds to produce the iCrates Annual, a high-quality print mag celebrating the past year in musical archaeology. Backers can look forward to exclusive vinyl-only mixes for supporting the project, which will sound pretty sweet — even if they’re jamming on your iPod.

  8. Epic retro beatdown.
Fists of Awesome promises that “touchscreen violence will never be the same again.”
A relentlessly silly time-traveling action extravaganza, the game combines a “needlessly complex interstellar plot” with delightfully simple pixelated graphics — and a whole lot of lumberjacking. As the “only game that lets you punch a full-grown grizzly bear in the face,” Fists of Awesome is clearly a rare gem. Now become a backer and get ready to save the world from homicidal woodland critters hellbent on enslaving the Earth.

    Epic retro beatdown.

    Fists of Awesome promises that “touchscreen violence will never be the same again.”

    A relentlessly silly time-traveling action extravaganza, the game combines a “needlessly complex interstellar plot” with delightfully simple pixelated graphics — and a whole lot of lumberjacking. As the “only game that lets you punch a full-grown grizzly bear in the face,” Fists of Awesome is clearly a rare gem. Now become a backer and get ready to save the world from homicidal woodland critters hellbent on enslaving the Earth.

  9. Buen provecho!
Marcella Kriebel’s beautifully illustrated cookbook, Comida Latina, is a culinary travelogue of Latin America. 
Each recipe is based on a memory from her time spent traveling from Mexico to Ecuador, seeking out beloved dishes and sharing them with family and friends. She’s gathered together Ecuadorian-style shrimp ceviche, a classic arroz con pollo, tamales, empanadas, salsas galore, and even technical tips like “The Best Way to Cut an Onion” — all depicted in her bright and charming watercolors. 
Now pull up a chair and dig in to this Project of the Day.

    Buen provecho!

    Marcella Kriebel’s beautifully illustrated cookbook, Comida Latina, is a culinary travelogue of Latin America. 

    Each recipe is based on a memory from her time spent traveling from Mexico to Ecuador, seeking out beloved dishes and sharing them with family and friends. She’s gathered together Ecuadorian-style shrimp ceviche, a classic arroz con pollo, tamales, empanadas, salsas galore, and even technical tips like “The Best Way to Cut an Onion” — all depicted in her bright and charming watercolors. 

    Now pull up a chair and dig in to this Project of the Day.

  10. Interview: Stephen Elliott’s movie-making addiction.
Stephen Elliott is the author of seven books and founding editor of The Rumpus, an online journal of cultural commentary. He’s also the director of About Cherry, his first film, which debuted at this year’s Berlin Film Festival. 
For Elliott, a veteran cinephile, making a movie proved to be addictive. However, his raw subject matter, unsentimental approach to sexuality and violence, and pitch-black sense of humor resonate far more strongly among his legion of devotees than within the traditional film business. So he built a Kickstarter project for his latest endeavor: An adaptation of his award-winning 2004 novel, Happy Baby.
We met up with Elliott deep within the internet to discuss his new project, film addiction, Kickstarter collaborators, and the continuing positive influence of Dave Eggers.

Kickstarter: Hi Stephen, how’s it going?
Stephen: Good! I’d say great, but I don’t know what that looks like :)
Kickstarter is stressful.
Kickstarter: We keep discovering that it’s more or less a full-time job compressed into 30 days…
Stephen: I’m feeling that. We’re doing it in 35 days because of Thanksgiving.
Kickstarter: Gotta make time for the stuffing and the food coma.
Stephen: :)
Kickstarter: So you just made About Cherry this year. Ready for all the stress and aggravation again so soon? Or was that experience really positive?
Stephen: Do you edit out smiley faces?
Kickstarter: We will make them larger.
Stephen: The experience of making About Cherry was really positive. But I learned some things about how I want to make movies, as I continue making them.
We had good investors on that movie but there was a certain pressure to tell a traditional story. I felt obligated to make the investors back their money. And we did. All the investors made a bit of money on that movie.
But I don’t want to have to think about that. I’ve never approached writing books like that, or starting the literary site The Rumpus.
But the actual making of the movie, production, pre-production, editing, was just about the best time of my life. Making movies is addictive.
Kickstarter: Is it more satisfying than your literary work? Or just different?
Stephen: It’s very similar. Creatively, during production you’re always on, which is as much fun as a creative person can have. You’re creative all day long. Editing a movie is very much like writing a book. There’s no real time limit, you just go over it, tinkering endlessly. There was a little pressure on About Cherry to finish editing so we could apply to festivals. This time I’m going to edit the movie myself, with feedback from Kickstarter backers, and take as long as it takes. We won’t apply to festivals until the movie is done.
Which is how I do my books. I never pitch books. I write them, then I try to publish them.
Kickstarter: So far, so good!
What are you hoping to get out of your Kickstarter backers? Other than their hard-earned scratch?
Stephen: I honestly believe in investors as collaborators. Everybody that works on a movie is a collaborator, and the better you harness that creative energy the better the project is going to be. So we designed most of our rewards to draw the backers deeper into the project. The first thing they get is the script. Hollywood can be very secretive about scripts, but we’ll put it right out there. Then we’ll ask them to choose finalists for some of the parts using Let It Cast.
My favorite thing is that they will be our test audience.
Often, when you’re editing a movie, you screen the movie for a test audience. We’re going to host a screening of the movie online, before it’s finished, for our backers. There will be a chatroom, and each participant will be given a survey to fill out.
It won’t be like they can just watch it anytime. They’ll have to log in at a certain time and they all watch it together. That’s about as much creative input as you could have.
As the director, I’ll still have final cut. I’ve taught writing workshops and the thing about writing workshops is you don’t use all of the criticism. You develop a filter that enables you to shift through criticism and find the ideas that work best for the story you’re trying to tell. It’s completely unique to each individual. Criticism that works for me is different from what works for you, but we’re all responsible for maintaining our own filters. That’s why I look at criticism as such a positive thing and why I’m excited about the screenings. Not because I’ll take every piece of advice offered but because I know enough of it will be helpful and really good and open the movie up in ways I wouldn’t have imagined on my own.
Kickstarter: Thinking about the directions the film might take, is it strange to re-engage with work you wrote almost a decade ago? What’s changed — for you and for Happy Baby?
Stephen: It’s a whole new project. I actually didn’t think Happy Baby could be adapted. I’d tried a bunch of times and failed. Then in June I went for a drink with Dave Eggers and I was saying I wanted to do another movie and he suggested Happy Baby. He edited the book and it was originally published by his publishing house, McSweeney’s. I told him it couldn’t be done and he said, Just do this, then this, then that. In the morning I started following his advice, because he really is an amazing editor, though I didn’t believe him this time. Sure enough the movie just opened up. I had a first draft done in three days. It wasn’t very good but I knew it would be a movie.
It ends up being a different story though. And when we cast it it will change and become a different story from the one it is now.
And when we edit it, it will again become something entirely different.
Kickstarter: Is there a dream Theo for the film?
Stephen: Ha! There are a few different actors that could take the character entirely different directions. But I think if I named one I would be jinxing the project.
There are some really well known actors already on board to act in the movie, but I haven’t received permission from all of them yet to mention them on the Kickstarter page.
Which is actually a result of hurricane Sandy. They’re busy with more important things.
Kickstarter: We’ll keep it between us! Wait, no we won’t…
Stephen: :)
James Urbaniak is in to play Mr. Gracie. So that’s one person we can name. Alex Karpovsky, from Girls, has a small role.
Kickstarter: My turn: :)
One last question — and many thanks for taking the time!
Stephen: My pleasure.
Kickstarter: A lot of your work carefully balances humor and darkness, but Happy Baby is even darker than most. Were you concerned about depicting horrors that your readers are left to imagine? Did the subject matter influence your decision to launch a Kickstarter project rather than seek traditional movie investors?
Stephen: Interesting. It is true that I didn’t want to have to convince anybody that this was a project with mass appeal. Hopefully, this will be a movie that’s unlike any other movie. I didn’t want to promise anyone would make their money back. I wanted investors who were invested in making the best movie possible. As long as that’s our goal I think everything will work out.

    Interview: Stephen Elliott’s movie-making addiction.

    Stephen Elliott is the author of seven books and founding editor of The Rumpus, an online journal of cultural commentary. He’s also the director of About Cherry, his first film, which debuted at this year’s Berlin Film Festival. 

    For Elliott, a veteran cinephile, making a movie proved to be addictive. However, his raw subject matter, unsentimental approach to sexuality and violence, and pitch-black sense of humor resonate far more strongly among his legion of devotees than within the traditional film business. So he built a Kickstarter project for his latest endeavor: An adaptation of his award-winning 2004 novel, Happy Baby.

    We met up with Elliott deep within the internet to discuss his new project, film addiction, Kickstarter collaborators, and the continuing positive influence of Dave Eggers.

    Kickstarter: Hi Stephen, how’s it going?

    Stephen: Good! I’d say great, but I don’t know what that looks like :)

    Kickstarter is stressful.

    Kickstarter: We keep discovering that it’s more or less a full-time job compressed into 30 days…

    Stephen: I’m feeling that. We’re doing it in 35 days because of Thanksgiving.

    Kickstarter: Gotta make time for the stuffing and the food coma.

    Stephen: :)

    Kickstarter: So you just made About Cherry this year. Ready for all the stress and aggravation again so soon? Or was that experience really positive?

    Stephen: Do you edit out smiley faces?

    Kickstarter: We will make them larger.

    Stephen: The experience of making About Cherry was really positive. But I learned some things about how I want to make movies, as I continue making them.

    We had good investors on that movie but there was a certain pressure to tell a traditional story. I felt obligated to make the investors back their money. And we did. All the investors made a bit of money on that movie.

    But I don’t want to have to think about that. I’ve never approached writing books like that, or starting the literary site The Rumpus.

    But the actual making of the movie, production, pre-production, editing, was just about the best time of my life. Making movies is addictive.

    Kickstarter: Is it more satisfying than your literary work? Or just different?

    Stephen: It’s very similar. Creatively, during production you’re always on, which is as much fun as a creative person can have. You’re creative all day long. Editing a movie is very much like writing a book. There’s no real time limit, you just go over it, tinkering endlessly. There was a little pressure on About Cherry to finish editing so we could apply to festivals. This time I’m going to edit the movie myself, with feedback from Kickstarter backers, and take as long as it takes. We won’t apply to festivals until the movie is done.

    Which is how I do my books. I never pitch books. I write them, then I try to publish them.

    Kickstarter: So far, so good!

    What are you hoping to get out of your Kickstarter backers? Other than their hard-earned scratch?

    Stephen: I honestly believe in investors as collaborators. Everybody that works on a movie is a collaborator, and the better you harness that creative energy the better the project is going to be. So we designed most of our rewards to draw the backers deeper into the project. The first thing they get is the script. Hollywood can be very secretive about scripts, but we’ll put it right out there. Then we’ll ask them to choose finalists for some of the parts using Let It Cast.

    My favorite thing is that they will be our test audience.

    Often, when you’re editing a movie, you screen the movie for a test audience. We’re going to host a screening of the movie online, before it’s finished, for our backers. There will be a chatroom, and each participant will be given a survey to fill out.

    It won’t be like they can just watch it anytime. They’ll have to log in at a certain time and they all watch it together. That’s about as much creative input as you could have.

    As the director, I’ll still have final cut. I’ve taught writing workshops and the thing about writing workshops is you don’t use all of the criticism. You develop a filter that enables you to shift through criticism and find the ideas that work best for the story you’re trying to tell. It’s completely unique to each individual. Criticism that works for me is different from what works for you, but we’re all responsible for maintaining our own filters. That’s why I look at criticism as such a positive thing and why I’m excited about the screenings. Not because I’ll take every piece of advice offered but because I know enough of it will be helpful and really good and open the movie up in ways I wouldn’t have imagined on my own.

    Kickstarter: Thinking about the directions the film might take, is it strange to re-engage with work you wrote almost a decade ago? What’s changed — for you and for Happy Baby?

    Stephen: It’s a whole new project. I actually didn’t think Happy Baby could be adapted. I’d tried a bunch of times and failed. Then in June I went for a drink with Dave Eggers and I was saying I wanted to do another movie and he suggested Happy Baby. He edited the book and it was originally published by his publishing house, McSweeney’s. I told him it couldn’t be done and he said, Just do this, then this, then that. In the morning I started following his advice, because he really is an amazing editor, though I didn’t believe him this time. Sure enough the movie just opened up. I had a first draft done in three days. It wasn’t very good but I knew it would be a movie.

    It ends up being a different story though. And when we cast it it will change and become a different story from the one it is now.

    And when we edit it, it will again become something entirely different.

    Kickstarter: Is there a dream Theo for the film?

    Stephen: Ha! There are a few different actors that could take the character entirely different directions. But I think if I named one I would be jinxing the project.

    There are some really well known actors already on board to act in the movie, but I haven’t received permission from all of them yet to mention them on the Kickstarter page.

    Which is actually a result of hurricane Sandy. They’re busy with more important things.

    Kickstarter: We’ll keep it between us! Wait, no we won’t…

    Stephen: :)

    James Urbaniak is in to play Mr. Gracie. So that’s one person we can name. Alex Karpovsky, from Girls, has a small role.

    Kickstarter: My turn: :)

    One last question — and many thanks for taking the time!

    Stephen: My pleasure.

    Kickstarter: A lot of your work carefully balances humor and darkness, but Happy Baby is even darker than most. Were you concerned about depicting horrors that your readers are left to imagine? Did the subject matter influence your decision to launch a Kickstarter project rather than seek traditional movie investors?

    Stephen: Interesting. It is true that I didn’t want to have to convince anybody that this was a project with mass appeal. Hopefully, this will be a movie that’s unlike any other movie. I didn’t want to promise anyone would make their money back. I wanted investors who were invested in making the best movie possible. As long as that’s our goal I think everything will work out.

  11. The Ghost Train Orchestra is a smokin’ hot 10-piece band that brings to life long-lost classics from the Jazz Age and beyond.
Devoted to under-appreciated composers of the prewar era, the Ghost Train Orchestra combines historical research with an all-star crew of seasoned jazz players to kick out the jams in all their sepia-toned glory. Bandleader Brian Carpenter has transformed 16 months of deep digging into a new arrangements of very old tunes, and he’s looking for support on Kickstarter to make an album from his discoveries.
So mosey down to the gin joint and get ready to jitterbug — this swell phonograph record is our Project of the Day.

    The Ghost Train Orchestra is a smokin’ hot 10-piece band that brings to life long-lost classics from the Jazz Age and beyond.

    Devoted to under-appreciated composers of the prewar era, the Ghost Train Orchestra combines historical research with an all-star crew of seasoned jazz players to kick out the jams in all their sepia-toned glory. Bandleader Brian Carpenter has transformed 16 months of deep digging into a new arrangements of very old tunes, and he’s looking for support on Kickstarter to make an album from his discoveries.

    So mosey down to the gin joint and get ready to jitterbug — this swell phonograph record is our Project of the Day.

  12. Mother Nature needs a salesman.

    Project Wild Thing is a documentary with a message: “Go play outside.”

    Filmmaker David Bond wants to know what happens if an entire generation of children grows up completely disconnected from the natural world. In an era of proliferating screens, kids are spending less time outdoors than ever before — and the impact could have profound consequences on our societal well-being.

    Bond’s mission takes on a sardonic edge when he enlists a team of marketing experts to help him sell nature back to the people, transforming an informative doc into a funny and provocative experience. Now all he needs is the funding to finish editing the film and deliver it to interested distributors.

    With a little boost from Kickstarter backers, Bond can complete his transformation from curious filmmaker to nature marketeer. It must be working, because Project Wild Thing is our Project of the Day.

  13. Liberty and zombies for all.
Illustrator Jeff McComsey has a dangerous affliction: He’s convinced everything tastes better with a heaping helping of zombies.
FUBAR is his anthology of zombie comics, which first brought together dozens of talented creators to recast the stories of World War II with an injection of the undead. The second volume in that series, Empire of the Rising Dead, was successfully funded on Kickstarter last year, and went on to become the first Kickstarter comics project to land on the New York Times best-seller list.
Now McComsey and an all-star crew are back with American History Z, a manic zombification of the past 236 years. From zombie George Washington to zombie Jimi Hendrix, FUBAR will cover the USA from sea to shining BRAAAAAAAIIINNS.
Forget what you may have learned — this undead history lesson is our Project of the Day.

    Liberty and zombies for all.

    Illustrator Jeff McComsey has a dangerous affliction: He’s convinced everything tastes better with a heaping helping of zombies.

    FUBAR is his anthology of zombie comics, which first brought together dozens of talented creators to recast the stories of World War II with an injection of the undead. The second volume in that series, Empire of the Rising Dead, was successfully funded on Kickstarter last year, and went on to become the first Kickstarter comics project to land on the New York Times best-seller list.

    Now McComsey and an all-star crew are back with American History Z, a manic zombification of the past 236 years. From zombie George Washington to zombie Jimi Hendrix, FUBAR will cover the USA from sea to shining BRAAAAAAAIIINNS.

    Forget what you may have learned — this undead history lesson is our Project of the Day.

  14. We’re happy to catch sight of LA Game Space popping up across the web. More than just a one-off project, the creators hope to develop an interdisciplinary venue for design, research, and play in the heart of Los Angeles’ arts district.

    prostheticknowledge:

    LA Game Space - Kickstarter 

    Ambitious yet exciting project looking for funding - a creative gaming Bauhaus to educate, develop and push the video game into a forward thinking artform:

    Game design has always featured creativity and experimentation, from the earliest pioneers to the recent rise of independent creators.  And yet, we have barely begun to explore the potential of video games.

    Let’s create a place for exploring that potential. A place for game innovation, education, and exhibition, where all of us can play and make and study and showcase games.  A place where we will rediscover what games have been, and re-imagine what games can be.

    Join us in founding LA Game Space!

    You can find out more at the project’s Kickstarter page here

    View on Kickstarter
  15. Confident critters.

    Nathan Catlin wrote the children’s book Animals With Insecurities for a friend who was good at cheering him up.

    Each page is dedicated to a particular animal and a relatable insecurity they might have about themselves — big ears, furry bodies, large eyes — and why these unusual traits are actually quite useful. The low-key confidence boosters and clever, paper-based illustrations could perk up even the saddest panda.