1. Got the Power, a boombox scuplture by Bayete Ross Smith, was a Kickstarter project back in 2011. The original sculpture is still on view at Franconia Sculpture Park in Minnesota, but another iteration of it (called Got the Power: Brooklyn) is now on view at BRIC as a part of an exhibition called Art Into Music. 
There’s also a great interview with Bayete over at Cameron C. Russell’s blog. 

    Got the Power, a boombox scuplture by Bayete Ross Smith, was a Kickstarter project back in 2011. The original sculpture is still on view at Franconia Sculpture Park in Minnesota, but another iteration of it (called Got the Power: Brooklyn) is now on view at BRIC as a part of an exhibition called Art Into Music

    There’s also a great interview with Bayete over at Cameron C. Russell’s blog. 

  2. Butterflies over New York.

    The Butterflies of Memory aims to become one of the largest public art projects in New York City. 

    A site-specific installation on little known Roosevelt Island in the East River, the artist’s giant butterfly sculptures are rigged to skinny metal poles, extending from the roof of the ruined smallpox hospital on the tip of the island.

    Serving as physical manifestations of inspiration, these golden-winged creatures will be visible to millions of New Yorkers every day.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Nature’s bounty.

    Mending Season is a series of tiny sculptures fashioned from the artist’s own garden vegetables.

    Green-thumbed artist Leah Gauthier often works with ephemeral materials, emphasizing the transient existence of nature’s many structures and forms. As each veggie sculpture lasts only a few hours, Gauthier is using her new Kickstarter project to fund a series of prints, capturing these momentary assemblages before they return to the soil.

    View on Kickstarter
  4. Meet Cobalt.
This tough customer is the prototype for Chicago-based artist Bryan Sperry’s new sculpture series, Warriors of the Apocalypse. 
Made largely from found materials on the rough-and-tumble streets of Sperry’s Pilsen neighborhood, his retro-futuristic forms imagine a world of dystopian freedom fighters emerging from the urban landscape. The artist is currently funding production and publication of a full-color catalog documenting his found-object cyber soldiers.

    Meet Cobalt.

    This tough customer is the prototype for Chicago-based artist Bryan Sperry’s new sculpture series, Warriors of the Apocalypse

    Made largely from found materials on the rough-and-tumble streets of Sperry’s Pilsen neighborhood, his retro-futuristic forms imagine a world of dystopian freedom fighters emerging from the urban landscape. The artist is currently funding production and publication of a full-color catalog documenting his found-object cyber soldiers.

    View on Kickstarter
  5. How to make a dinosaur head. 

    We’ve been following Tyler Keillor, a sculptor who specializes in skull and flesh reconstructions, since he launched his project to create an authoritative full-body reconstruction of Dryptosaurus.

    Seeing as we never thought about the men and women who tirelessly work to accurately reproduce an extinct species, it’s been fascinating to watch Tyler prepare for such a massive undertaking. It’s been even more wonderful seeing his work as it comes together, as you can see above. 

    View on Kickstarter