1. Women on two wheels.
Ann DeOtte’s designs solve a basic problem: Can you bike in comfort and dress with style?
Her clever answer is Iva Jean, a line of functional clothing for women cyclists that works on and off your ride. DeOtte’s pieces employ just a few clever nips and tucks to seamlessly transition from road to office.
Take the Reveal skirt, pictured above. The tailored skirt unzips in the back to expose additional fabric for easy pedaling, and features a high-waisted cut for comfortable coverage. It’s safety first and fashion forward at the same time — and it’s also our Project of the Day.

    Women on two wheels.

    Ann DeOtte’s designs solve a basic problem: Can you bike in comfort and dress with style?

    Her clever answer is Iva Jean, a line of functional clothing for women cyclists that works on and off your ride. DeOtte’s pieces employ just a few clever nips and tucks to seamlessly transition from road to office.

    Take the Reveal skirt, pictured above. The tailored skirt unzips in the back to expose additional fabric for easy pedaling, and features a high-waisted cut for comfortable coverage. It’s safety first and fashion forward at the same time — and it’s also our Project of the Day.

    View on Kickstarter
  2. Phở life.
A rapper, producer, and art director with a love for all things Việt, Sabzi and his goons know a thing or two about phở. Taking their love for the staple Vietnamese soup to the next level, Sabzi has designed a Kickstarter campaign to celebrate the miraculous beef broth in all its belly-warming glory.
Sabzi’s Saigon-style swag will let you rep phở all day. Hoisin homies take heed.

    Phở life.

    A rapper, producer, and art director with a love for all things Việt, Sabzi and his goons know a thing or two about phở. Taking their love for the staple Vietnamese soup to the next level, Sabzi has designed a Kickstarter campaign to celebrate the miraculous beef broth in all its belly-warming glory.

    Sabzi’s Saigon-style swag will let you rep phở all day. Hoisin homies take heed.

  3. Take it for a ride.

    Ann DeOtte started designing out of a basic need — she rode her bike on a daily basis, and had trouble transitioning from bike-appropriate gear to her workday. So why not just create her own line of clothing that would be as casually fashionable as it was functional? The answer to that question is Iva Jean.

    DeOtte’s pieces employ just a few clever nips and tucks to ease the transition from road to office. Take the Reveal Skirt, pictured above. The tailored skirt unzips in the back to expose additional fabric for easy pedaling, and features a high-waisted cut for comfortable coverage. Other pieces to look out for are the Everyday Blouse and the Two-Way Reflective Vest, which is reflective on one side and minimal chic on the other.

  4. Creator Q&A: The Scott and Kris Show

    Kris and Scott’s Scott and Kris Show by Vantage Point Productions

    Kris Straub and Scott Kurtz are no strangers to comedy. They’ve worked together on animated web series like PVP: The Series and Penny Arcade’s Blamimations, and they’re both veterans in the world of web comics. But in all this time, they’ve never created a show that was all about Kris and Scott. Naturally, they’ve remedied this by creating the Scott and Kris Show, a new comedic web series where they’ll be in front of the camera and taking their fans behind-the-scenes in what may or may not be their real lives.

    With 1,200+ backers and counting, Kris and Scott’s latest adventure is proof again that internet fan communities are a force to be reckoned with. Below, Kris, Scott, and Vantage Point Productions (a.k.a. VPP) answer a few semi-invasive questions about the show, and Scott has the last word on a little Kickstarter controversy he sparked way back in ‘09.

    What made you decide to bring this project to Kickstarter?

    VPP: We all really wanted to do a show, but none of us had the means to fund it ourselves. Robert Khoo [of Penny Arcade] had suggested we try Kickstarting it, and so we looked into it more and agreed it was worth a shot. The worst that could happen was we wouldn’t receive any funding and then we just wouldn’t do the show.

    You hit over 50% of your goal within 24 hours of launching — crazy! Did you expect this sort of reaction?

    Kris Straub: I never would have believed it. I still barely can. I kept imagining some asymptotic tapering-off of pledges where we never actually got anywhere near the goal. But we will land on it sometime in the next six hours (note: they’re actually way over that now), with 26 days left! The response from our audience has been profoundly humbling. Now the discussion shifts from “do we get to even do this” to “what can we do to make it incredible?”

    Absolutely loved the pilot episode! Was the idea all along that the pilot would also double as a pitch video for Kickstarter? How scripted was it vs. how much is this really just what happens when you follow Scott and Kris with cameras? 

    VPP: We specifically wanted to have a great pilot that would show the fans what an episode would look like and inspire them to give. As far as what is real and what is scripted….that is part of the fun of making the show. Keeping the audience guessing which parts are real and which are planned. Except Scott’s acupuncture boner. That was very real.

    Is Robert Khoo awesome or what?

    VPP: He is pretty Khool.

    A little over a year ago, Scott was a pretty outspoken skeptic of Kickstarter as a funding platform for comics projects. Now that he’s involved in a project himself, would he be willing to talk a little about what the experience has been like? Does he view Kickstarter differently now?

    Scott Kurtz: My concern was that webcomic creators were going to flood Kickstarter and abuse a system designed for helping independent creatives without any kind of reach at all. A comic author with an audience large enough to support book sales could take pre-orders via paypal. My concern was that a flood of webcomic creators asking for handouts was going to ruin some goodwill. 

    But since then I’ve learned that you can’t take pre-orders through paypal that don’t ship within 30 days. Which makes using pre-order money to print a book pretty much impossible. Given that, websites like Kickstarter really are the only place to raise money to fund any project more than 30 days out. So yes, my opinion on using Kickstarter to fund comics projects has changed.

    Also, I’m a known hypocrite.