1. Mine-detecting tumbleweed.
Afghan artist Massoud Hassani invented a simple machine for his war-torn homeland.
Mine Kafon is a low-cost landmine detonator powered by the wind. Like a man-made tumbleweed, the device rolls across flat terrain to activate buried mines, relaying their locations back to a home base. It’s thoughtful design with the power to make the world a better place.
Our Project of the Day, Mine Kafon seeks funds to rebuild the prototype and deploy in Afghanistan.

    Mine-detecting tumbleweed.

    Afghan artist Massoud Hassani invented a simple machine for his war-torn homeland.

    Mine Kafon is a low-cost landmine detonator powered by the wind. Like a man-made tumbleweed, the device rolls across flat terrain to activate buried mines, relaying their locations back to a home base. It’s thoughtful design with the power to make the world a better place.

    Our Project of the Day, Mine Kafon seeks funds to rebuild the prototype and deploy in Afghanistan.

  2. Danger zone.

    Afghan artist Massoud Hassani invented a simple machine for his war-torn homeland.

    Mine Kafon is a low-cost landmine detonator powered by the wind. Like a man-made tumbleweed, the device rolls across flat terrain to activate buried mines, relaying their locations back to a home base. The artist’s new Kickstarter project seeks funds to rebuild the prototype and deploy in Afghanistan.

    View on Kickstarter
  3. Battle in the borderlands.

    Reckoning at the Frontier is a photographic reflection of the ongoing Mexican drug war.

    Pieced together by photojournalist Eros Hoagland over the course of seven years, the book captures a brutal conflict in northern Mexico from the perspective of civilians, federales, and the desert itself. Moving beyond the objective eye of the documentarian, Hoagland injects a cinematic sensibility to “reveal a country at war with its own ghosts.”

    Hoagland’s work has appeared in the New York Times, Time magazine, and many other publications during an 18-year career — yet he’s never published a book. Hoagland hopes to change that with Reckoning at the Frontier, while sharing an intimate and complex perspective on one of the defining conflicts of Mexico’s modern history.

  4. Art during wartime.

    The Streets of Afghanistan is a public art installation that aims to immerse viewers in the busy streets of Kabul and the roads of rural Afghanistan through a combination of life-size photographs, video projections, live music, kites, and — most importantly — people.

    The exhibit was supported by a Kickstarter project that reached its funding goal just a few months ago, and has since gone on to stage five successful shows and two photo installations at historic sites across Afghanistan — from Kabul’s historic Darulaman Palace to the heavily damaged village of Istalif.

    According to the creators’ most recent project update, the largest exhibition took place at The Barbur Gardens in Kabul, which over 1000 locals came to visit on the installation’s second day.

  5. GEMSI is an organization committed to the spread of maker and hacker initiatives across the globe. Rooted in the belief that DIY technology empowers people in struggling communities, GEMSI partnered with a young Beirut-based creator named Bilal Ghalib to launch a project in Baghdad. 
Ghalib turned to Kickstarter to fund a pilot project in Iraq and raised nearly $30,000 just over a month ago. Yesterday, he shared a project update live from Baghdad to report back on the project’s progress.
The funding allowed Ghalib and his Iraqi collaborators to transform a local café into a pop-up hackerspace, organize workshops on everything from 3D printing to e-textiles, and even create a panoramic Google street view for a downtown park that has long been isolated by nearly a decade of war.
Congratulations to Ghalib and GEMSI on what sounds like a seriously inspiring week in a very difficult place.

    GEMSI is an organization committed to the spread of maker and hacker initiatives across the globe. Rooted in the belief that DIY technology empowers people in struggling communities, GEMSI partnered with a young Beirut-based creator named Bilal Ghalib to launch a project in Baghdad. 

    Ghalib turned to Kickstarter to fund a pilot project in Iraq and raised nearly $30,000 just over a month ago. Yesterday, he shared a project update live from Baghdad to report back on the project’s progress.

    The funding allowed Ghalib and his Iraqi collaborators to transform a local café into a pop-up hackerspace, organize workshops on everything from 3D printing to e-textiles, and even create a panoramic Google street view for a downtown park that has long been isolated by nearly a decade of war.

    Congratulations to Ghalib and GEMSI on what sounds like a seriously inspiring week in a very difficult place.

  6. KSR IRL: The International Documentary Association’s 15th annual DocuWeeks Theatrical Documentary Showcase features currently live KSR projects The Mexican Suitcase and Dying to do Letterman. If you’re in NYC, both screen @ IFC Center TOMORROW, 8/26 with filmmakers in person. Get your tix now!
The Mexican Suitcase is a “90 minute feature documentary that tells the incredible story of the recovery of 4,500 negatives taken by photographers Robert Capa, Gerda Taro and David Seymour during the Spanish Civil War,” and Dying to do Letterman ”follows funny man Steve Mazan as he chases a larger-than-life dream: performing stand-up comedy on David Letterman’s show. However, his quest becomes far more urgent when he’s told he may only have five years to live.” Both projects are raising funds to offset the costs of these theatrical runs. 
The Mexican Suitcase Filmmaker Trisha Ziff will appear at the following NYC screenings: Fri 8/26 at 5:25pm; Sat 8/27 at 7:35pm; Sun 8/28 at 9:50pm; and Mon 8/29 at 7:30pm. In person in LA: Fri 9/2 at 7:20pm, Sat 9/3 at 9:45pm
Dying to do LettermanFilmmakers Joke Fincioen and Biago Messina will appear at the following NYC screenings: Fri 8/26 at 7:25pm; Sat 8/27 at 5:25pm; and Sun 8/28 at 9:45pm. In person in LA: Fri 9/2 at 9:45pm; Sat 9/3 at 5:20pm; Sun 9/4 at 7:30pm
Click here for a complete list of showtimes and tix.

    KSR IRL: The International Documentary Association’s 15th annual DocuWeeks Theatrical Documentary Showcase features currently live KSR projects The Mexican Suitcase and Dying to do LettermanIf you’re in NYC, both screen @ IFC Center TOMORROW, 8/26 with filmmakers in person. Get your tix now!

    The Mexican Suitcase is a “90 minute feature documentary that tells the incredible story of the recovery of 4,500 negatives taken by photographers Robert Capa, Gerda Taro and David Seymour during the Spanish Civil War,” and Dying to do Letterman follows funny man Steve Mazan as he chases a larger-than-life dream: performing stand-up comedy on David Letterman’s show. However, his quest becomes far more urgent when he’s told he may only have five years to live.” Both projects are raising funds to offset the costs of these theatrical runs. 

    The Mexican Suitcase Filmmaker Trisha Ziff will appear at the following NYC screenings: Fri 8/26 at 5:25pm; Sat 8/27 at 7:35pm; Sun 8/28 at 9:50pm; and Mon 8/29 at 7:30pm. In person in LA: Fri 9/2 at 7:20pm, Sat 9/3 at 9:45pm

    Dying to do LettermanFilmmakers Joke Fincioen and Biago Messina will appear at the following NYC screenings: Fri 8/26 at 7:25pm; Sat 8/27 at 5:25pm; and Sun 8/28 at 9:45pm. In person in LA: Fri 9/2 at 9:45pm; Sat 9/3 at 5:20pm; Sun 9/4 at 7:30pm

    Click here for a complete list of showtimes and tix.